Please upgrade your browser for the best possible experience.

Chrome Firefox Internet Explorer
×

Sith Warrior Choices--Who to kill?

STAR WARS: The Old Republic > English > Story and Lore > Spoilers
Sith Warrior Choices--Who to kill?

EAFSAMWISE's Avatar


EAFSAMWISE
06.10.2021 , 11:53 PM | #1
Strictly speaking if one seeks to play as a Sith Warrior who is both reasonable (a.k.a. not simply a murderous bloodthirsty maniac) but is also a person of their times and place (someone who seeks to live by expectations and standards of their setting) and also has a "redeemable" edge, the Sith Warrior poses a bit of a challenge. This is especially true given that you have no choice in killing your rival on Korriban and that your primary reason for even being there is due to Tremel's xenophobic agenda, not to mention you own a slave and even the nicest options don't involve freeing her right away. With this in mind, here is what the best options are--
1) Kill Tremel and Lord Rathari. They're meant to represent certain ideals which are holding the Sith back. A light-sided warrior would seek to reject the xenophobia of Tremel and the power-scheming of Rathari and his crookedness because they believe in a sense of honor which is a source of pride for their heritage.
2) Be loyal to Baras but wary--being a traditional Sith from a more respectable background, you obviously value respecting and obeying authority but given that Sith culture expects betrayal, don't act surprised when Baras betrays you and don't be uncompromisingly loyal to him. You do as he asks and help him execute Plan Zero because for the time being you recognize he's stronger than you and has connections. Don't actively seek to subvert authority but seek to embody what you feel your heritage stands for in an honorable way.
3) Romance Vette and marry her (if you're male)--this *basically* frees her insofar as one of her heritage can be "free" in the Empire. Jaesa can only be romanced if she's dark-sided and that version of her is essentially a hedonistic, sadistic jerk who doesn't even stay faithful to you.
4) Gradually become less dark-sided but more resolved for your ideals--this is best illustrated when you battle what appears to be an opposite version of yourself in the cave on Tatooine. If you're light-side leaning, you essentially defeat your dark side and overcome it.
5) Kill the strong, spare the weak--stronger or more experienced targets are worthy and honorable opponents, such as Tremel or Nomen Karr. Kill them but spare the acolytes who attack you since they could be given time to become more powerful and of use, and of course killing them in the academy itself would get you in trouble so you follow the rules.

coldserpent's Avatar


coldserpent
06.15.2021 , 06:29 PM | #2
Quote: Originally Posted by EAFSAMWISE View Post
Strictly speaking if one seeks to play as a Sith Warrior who is both reasonable (a.k.a. not simply a murderous bloodthirsty maniac) but is also a person of their times and place (someone who seeks to live by expectations and standards of their setting) and also has a "redeemable" edge, the Sith Warrior poses a bit of a challenge. This is especially true given that you have no choice in killing your rival on Korriban and that your primary reason for even being there is due to Tremel's xenophobic agenda, not to mention you own a slave and even the nicest options don't involve freeing her right away. With this in mind, here is what the best options are--
1) Kill Tremel and Lord Rathari. They're meant to represent certain ideals which are holding the Sith back. A light-sided warrior would seek to reject the xenophobia of Tremel and the power-scheming of Rathari and his crookedness because they believe in a sense of honor which is a source of pride for their heritage.
2) Be loyal to Baras but wary--being a traditional Sith from a more respectable background, you obviously value respecting and obeying authority but given that Sith culture expects betrayal, don't act surprised when Baras betrays you and don't be uncompromisingly loyal to him. You do as he asks and help him execute Plan Zero because for the time being you recognize he's stronger than you and has connections. Don't actively seek to subvert authority but seek to embody what you feel your heritage stands for in an honorable way.
3) Romance Vette and marry her (if you're male)--this *basically* frees her insofar as one of her heritage can be "free" in the Empire. Jaesa can only be romanced if she's dark-sided and that version of her is essentially a hedonistic, sadistic jerk who doesn't even stay faithful to you.
4) Gradually become less dark-sided but more resolved for your ideals--this is best illustrated when you battle what appears to be an opposite version of yourself in the cave on Tatooine. If you're light-side leaning, you essentially defeat your dark side and overcome it.
5) Kill the strong, spare the weak--stronger or more experienced targets are worthy and honorable opponents, such as Tremel or Nomen Karr. Kill them but spare the acolytes who attack you since they could be given time to become more powerful and of use, and of course killing them in the academy itself would get you in trouble so you follow the rules.
I did the opposite of many of these choices. While still applying just enough force to make a point in my decisions. I accept that my Sith Warriors are killers, but they still exhibit restraint. With much of their decision making involving reason.

1. I kept Tremel and Lord Rathari alive. To witness the rise of one who would take down Baras. If these two were left alive, they have opportunity to learn the errors of their mindsets, to evolve from them. And they already know that my Sith Warrior can put them down. With Rathari, I also gained loyalty from him. And Tremel's elitist views weren't completely wrong.

2. My responses to Baras were means to test him, so I was antagonistic or comedic. Not subservient. Authority only has teeth if it's actively enforced. Each time I had a wiseass remark for Baras, I got a warning, but....nothing after that. No force choke through the holo-call, for myself or my companions. Fear of him was dissipating as time went on. Use your head to probe the defenses and weaknesses of your enemy. For later on.

3. Bantha poodoo. It's perfectly reasonable to romance and marry Darkside Jaesa while still holding onto your ideals. And she does become loyal to you, and faithful to you. You start to see it on Taris if you have her along, as well as when she's on her "side mission" crusade. That's when she realizes that being a chaotic maelstrom won't lead to longevity. To where she falls in love, because you allowed her to stumble when she was first exploring the rush of passions and emotions. She adapts and matures pretty quickly as long as you are supportive while advising her, even going so far as to reining in her hedonistic urges, and being more mindful of using her power. I don't go clutching pearls when she makes her remarks of wanting edged weapons, or wondering if someone was inside of a hovertank when it blows up. I let her have her pressure valve, so that she can vent here and there. And you'll start to get letters from her that affirm her love of you, and how your steadfastness is an inspiration to her. With just starting Shadows of Revan on my main, I'm not even wandering over to the Martha Stewart Sith character.

4. You seem to have this idea that dark side = evil and light side = good. It's not quite as simple as that. Or that dark side is always murderous. Light side and dark side both carry levels of pragmatism to them.

5. I spared Jaesa's parents, because at times, the carrot is more powerful than the stick. And because they could have the chance to see their daughter grow and mature without the self-detructive Jedi altruism holding her back. It wasn't because they were weak that they were spared. I killed her Jedi master teacher on Tatooine because he thought it would be funny to pit himself and his apprentice against me after he put the Snoopy hand on my companion at the time for a nap. I had Jaesa kill Nomen Karr, because she saw the self-destructive nature, as well as the logic when exposed to his hypocrisy. With the acolytes at the academy who wanted to kill your first rival, I spared them, after giving them a beating as a lesson. I even advised them to steer clear of my first rival. His toadie, I spared because I gained financial compensation from it. Baras' other apprentice died twice because he didn't learn his lesson the first time. This idea of chasing the strongest targets in the name of "honor" means nothing. It's like Worf's human/Federation puppet notion of "honor." Pragmatism is far more effective.

You may want to reword your idea that the decision making you laid out is "Best in Slot.". While reading The Art of War, or watching the Philosophy of Kreia video. Maybe best decision making for you, but not for everyone. Ultimately, who to kill is left to the player to decide on who he/she views as a threat current, or possibly in the future.