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what i don't understand

FunkyNassau's Avatar


FunkyNassau
12.14.2011 , 09:09 AM | #1
I am not an angry pre-order customer. What I don't understand however is this :

if you know how many pre-orders you have, and you have a target population for each server, why not have launched with enough servers to accommodate half the target spread out evenly amongst the pre-orders? Then allow them to fill up to cap during the actual launch, adding servers as needed.

This would permit all customers to have access and place any queue-times in the lap of the customer as they are the ones who select which server they roll on.

Just wondering. Good luck everyone

Hakalo's Avatar


Hakalo
12.14.2011 , 09:10 AM | #2
because


"The sooner you order, the sooner you get to play"


BW/EA sold their souls to the devil,(hence more sales/more money)

Xfraze's Avatar


Xfraze
12.14.2011 , 09:19 AM | #3
Well...I work for a company that develops software and I've done technical support for an extended period of time.

It's my...experience...that most End Users tend to take the path of most resistance when it comes to using any product.

Theoretically, what you suggest should work, but in reality, people will pick a server, start playing, then their friends will pick that server, then their friend's friends will pick that server, and next thing you know, the entire thing is filled up and people are complaining about the queue time.

It's not really enough to have "enough" servers. Initial server distribution and placement is extremely important as well.

Not to mention, a lot of people purposefully try to play on a high pop server because then there are more chances for them to interact with other people either for PvE or PvP. As a result of people joining high pop or medium pop servers and staying away from the low pop ones, queue times rise.

Even if a an End User is directly responsible for the problem they've caused themselves, usually, they end up blaming the developer citing "If it won't work the way I want to use it (Read:To hell with how you actually designed it to be use), then it's crap."

A lot of this is something people with no experience in technical support or development can understand...it's one of those things that you truly only get after having experienced it.

In the long run though, while the initial reaction may be harsh, it will go a long way towards extending the longevity of the game. Sure a lot of people are "hurt" about not getting into early access and are concerned about the head start others are getting, but come launch time, when the servers are already evenly distributed and tons of new players long on for the first time, you'll be thankful.

Well, probably not thankful. Another thing I've noticed about End Users is that they conveniently forget anything a developer has actually done right.