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Guide: What stats to pick?

STAR WARS: The Old Republic > English > Classes
Guide: What stats to pick?
 

Zunayson's Avatar


Zunayson
08.02.2012 , 09:32 AM | #1
PREFACE

If you just hit 50, and are looking to gear up, or don't have a lot of knowledge about your class yet, then this guide is NOT for you! This guide is to help determine the best Damage Per Rotation (DPR) for a class and spec, and the stats required to achieve it. Before anyone uses this guide, it is best to have a thorough knowledge of your class and specís rotation. A good rotation maintains perfect resource efficiency as well as using cooldowns and tools at your disposal to increase your damage. With that being said, let the guide commence!

STEP 1: YOUR ROTATION


The first step is two analyze your rotation, and it has two parts. The first part is to figure out your average DPR, assuming you have 0 power, you never crit, making surge irrelevant, and you have 100% accuracy on all moves. The second part involves finding out what percentage of your total DPR comes from ranged or melee damage (White damage), and what percentage of your total DPR comes from Tech or Force damage (Yellow damage). To calculate how much damage a move does, take it's max damage and add it to the minimum damage. Then divide by two.

ACCURACY


Accuracy determines your chance to hit with all attack types. Your base accuracy for Yellow damage is 100%, whereas your base accuracy for white damage is 90%. With 90% accuracy, that means that for every 10 times I use a white damage move, it will miss 1 time on average. If you were to look at how many times I used said white damage move, but then divided it by its total damage (That is, expected damage divided by total damage), you would see there is a 90% modifier. To help figure out your target DPR, multiply the damage done by all white damage attacks by your accuracy.

Sometimes, stacking accuracy doesnít yield a high efficiency that could be reached by stacking other stats. Take an Advanced Prototype (AP) Powertech, for example. In the optimal rotation I have for my AP, about 10% of my total damage is white damage, the rest is yellow. By stacking my way to 100% accuracy for white damage, I have increased my total DPR by 1% (10% of 10%). Iím sure stacking anything else will be more efficient!
Other times, stacking accuracy does yield the highest efficiency. In a Combat Sentinel, almost all moves are white damage. By stacking to 100% white damage accuracy, one is increasing all average DPR by 10%.

CRITICAL RATING AND SURGE


Critical rating determines your chance to critically hit, and Surge rating increases your critical multiplier. If you have 20% Crit, and 50% Surge, that means that for every 5 times you attack, 1 move will be a critical hit, and will be 1.5 times as powerful. The way to factor in Crit and Surge into your DPR is to multiply as follows: Crit * (1 + Surge) * DPR.

The aforementioned formula works for any move that has no temporary critical chance modifiers. Because of the distributive property of multiplication and addition, you can replace DPR with the damage dealt by each of your moves, then add those totals up. You will need to do that if you are, say, an inquisitor. In an inquisitorís rotation, Recklessness will probably be used. To factor in critical bonuses, you just add them to the crit. So, recklessness adds 60% crit to two moves. So, itís best to use it on your certain powerful move(s). Use the following formula: (Crit + .6) * (1 + Surge) * That move. Of course do it two times, because recklessness affects two moves. Instead of adding .6 to Crit, youíd at .8 to crit had the critical bonus be 80%, or .1 had the bonus been 10%. An easy way to do this is to take the two moves you want that critical bonus to be applied to, and subtract their DPR from the rest of your DPR, leaving two numbers. Substitute the first DPR (The one from the two moves you want), and replace that number with ďThat moveĒ on the aforementioned formula, and the remaining DPR from your moves, and add it to the normal formula of Crit * (1 + Surge) *DPR. Add the totals.

Obviously, the more critical rating you have that you donít need to stack with stats, the more weighted your surge becomes. Balancing out crit and surge can be pretty difficult, but luckily itís quantitative and objective, meaning there [i]is/[i] a setup that yields the highest average DPR. In a Focus Guardian, the guardian focuses on one move that has 100% critical chance, and double power. Since a large portion of their DPR is auto-crit, critical rating does not at all help that portion of the DPR, and Surge helps even more than in normal rotations. Because critical rating and surge rating have two variables, I havenít found a way to determine the average damage gain for crit and surge. Iím sure itís possible, but my brain just hasnít figured out a way. Any help will be appreciated!

POWER

Power is the one and only stat that doesnít have a DR, making it a good filler stat. 1 point of power gives a static .23 bonus to yellow and white bonus damage, and a static .17 bonus to yellow bonus healing. Getting the total DPR increase from Power stat requires knowing what percentage of your total DPR is affect by the power stat. Some moves get higher multiples of the bonus damage number. I believe (If I am wrong someone feel free to correct me) that moves have a coefficient that is multiplied by your Bonus Damage, which is the reason that move A is more powerful than move B.

Please note that the guide is still being made, and any information regarding the topic will be greatly appreciated!
Quote: Originally Posted by Uber_the_Goober View Post
Bioware couldn't balance a sheet of plywood if it were laying [sic] on the ground.
Quote: Originally Posted by Aragost View Post
Make sure you take 3/3 in the "knowing how to play" box

Infalliable's Avatar


Infalliable
08.02.2012 , 11:34 AM | #2
Quote:
To calculate how much damage a move does, take its max damage and subtract the minimum damage from it. Divide by two. Add that number to the minimum damage OR subtract it from the maximum damage number. Your choice.
Just take the average as (Min+Max)/2

It's the same thing, and much less convoluted than ((Max-Min)/2) + min or Max - ((Max-Min)/2)

Zunayson's Avatar


Zunayson
08.02.2012 , 12:40 PM | #3
Quote: Originally Posted by Infalliable View Post
Just take the average as (Min+Max)/2

It's the same thing, and much less convoluted than ((Max-Min)/2) + min or Max - ((Max-Min)/2)
Thank you, I edited that in, way too lazy to think, and maths teacher didn't teach us anything.
Quote: Originally Posted by Uber_the_Goober View Post
Bioware couldn't balance a sheet of plywood if it were laying [sic] on the ground.
Quote: Originally Posted by Aragost View Post
Make sure you take 3/3 in the "knowing how to play" box