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Island_Jedi's field manual to operations


Dark_Mithrandir's Avatar


Dark_Mithrandir
03.11.2015 , 10:50 AM | #11
Quote: Originally Posted by skomerko View Post
Point them up, please.
People will do that work for me, some already doing.
Ok i do another quite easy:

The guide says healers are more clicker friendly? good joke
Healers are very clicker unfriendly imo.
By clicking people in the ops frame i do not call people a "clicker".....

If i've to say what's the best class for a clicker that is definetly a rDps class.

Scoundrels are the worst single target healers atm... just saying

yucu's Avatar


yucu
03.11.2015 , 10:57 AM | #12
Not a bad overview of endgame for newbies, i'll be recommending it for my DPS and Tank friends if they ask. However I agree with the others, you got your Healers mixed up. Sages being the best at reactive and Commandos being the best at Sustained is the most glaring issue for me right now while Scoundrels being good at Single Target is slightly misleading as they can do better as AoE Healers in most scenarios.

Alucardess's Avatar


Alucardess
03.11.2015 , 11:19 AM | #13
I severely disagree with your definitions of proactive and reactive CDs. There is no discernable difference between DCDs. There is however, a difference in playstyle.
Reactive CDs in no way turn you into a brickwall more than proactive DCDs smooth out healing. There is simply knowing when and where to pop your DCDs. You didn't even specify damage type for certain DCDs.
This guide is somewhat passable for noobs in the most general sense, but if you're looking to get better at raiding, this guide is meh at best.
Aethil the Retired Eternal Warrior
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soowonlee's Avatar


soowonlee
03.11.2015 , 02:10 PM | #14
Thanks for writing this guide. While we may quibble over details, any attempt at trying to improve the raiding ability of the community is always welcome.

I take it that this is intended to be a primer on raiding. So, I'm not sure if my comments are pertinent, or if they might belong to more "intermediate" or "advanced" discussions.

First, a guildie posted this essay on raid awareness. Although it's written in the context of playing WoW, almost all of it translates directly to SWTOR. It's an excellent read and some of what I say draws from the article.

User Interface
Being a proficient raider requires that you be able to multitask well, i.e. track and respond to simultaneous events and respond accordingly. For instance, if you are tanking Unit 1 during the Sword Squadron fight, you will need to keep up your rotation in order hold threat while responding to the Rapid Fire, Ground Burst Missile, and Mega Blast mechanic. Furthermore, you have to keep track of Unit 2's changes in aggro in order to properly execute the tank swap. Each event imposes a cognitive tax. There is obviously a limit to how much any person can multitask. One thing that we can control, at least to some degree, is how easily we can track certain events. The easier it is to track an event, the less of a cognitive tax that event imposes. This is where user interface comes in. Most beginning raiders will just play with the default user interface, but this set up is not ideal. For instance, the target of target window is not enabled, information text on the target is not enabled, etc. It's crucial to set up your user interface so that it becomes easier to track events, thereby imposing a smaller cognitive tax. For example, healers can enlarge debuffs on the ops frames, making it easier to track cleansable debuffs and to respond quickly. (I remember before we had the ability to resize debuff icons. Cleansing the Writhing Horror debuff was such a pain in the ***.). The idea here is that less your eyes have to move across the screen or squint to get information, the more likely it is that you will respond to mechanics in a timely manner.

TL;DR Customize your user interface so that it becomes much easier to get important information quickly.

Here are some other points that deal with raid awareness, but are not directly UI related.

Camera zoom: During most encounters, your camera should be zoomed back to 100%. You can even zoom your camera back further than 100%. I generally keep my camera at 130%. Having your camera zoomed back means that there is more information available for your to see, and thus can increase your raid awareness.

Cooldown text: This is not part of your User Interface customization, but is essentially the same thing. If you go to Preferences > User Interface, you have the option to enable and modify your cooldown text. This is extremely useful for executing a rotation well and anticipating the use of cooldowns.

Parsing
Parsing, if beginners are aware of it at all, is usually associated with dps and epeen contests. This is an extremely naive view about parsing. Parsing provides a wealth of information to all three roles. As someone who primarily tanks, parsing provides me with damage profiles of each boss fight, so that I know which defensive cooldowns are effective against which boss abilities. Combat logs tell you how a fight transpired, and why members of the raid group were killed. Parsing not only gives you your dps, but atso tells you your dtps (damage taken per second) which is just as important a metric as dps for damage dealers. It also provides healing and effective healing metrics, as well as a profile of healing done by ability and target, all of which is useful information for healers.

Moreover, parsers like Parsec and StarParse provide combat timers, which alert you to relevant events occurring in game. This is a tremendous tool that allows players even more power to anticipate and respond to raid mechanics.

Another point about dtps. People always ask about what a good dps should be for a certain fight. I stated that all players should also be keeping track of their dtps. Here's a general rule of thumb about dtps. For most fights, dps and healers should be taking less than 1000 dtps. Appropriately geared tanks should be taking less than 2000 dtps for most fights. If you are taking more than this, and you are not in some exceptional circumstance (e.g. 5th dps off tanking Torque), then it is likely that you are either taking avoidable damage or not using your defensive cds effectively.

TL;DR Anyone who is serious about raiding uses a parser. Download and learn to use Parsec or StarParse.

VOIP
I don't have to spend too much on this one. If you want to join a serious progression group, then it almost certain that you will have to use either TeamSpeak, Mumble, or Ventrilo. Download all three and have them set up. Being able to communicate aurally during boss encounters increases raid awareness and is vital for raid coordination. This is especially true of fights that are coordination checks, such as HM Blaster, HM Coratanni, HM Revan, as well as Draxus, Calphayus, Operator IX, etc.

Okay, here are some smaller points about what the OP said initially.

Tanking
To elaborate on what the OP said about cooldowns, the difference between a good tank and an average tank is that a good tank uses defensive cooldowns proactively, whereas an average tank uses them reactively. This is what I mean. An average tank will generally pop a defensive cooldown when they see their health get too low. Basically, this is the "oh crap!" method of using cooldowns.

A good tank knows when the big hits in a fight will occur, what kind of damage that hit will be (melee/range or force/tech and kinetic/energy or internal/elemental), and will anticipate those by popping the appropriate cooldown just before those hits arrive. For instance, in the HM Bulo fight, a good tank will know when Scatterblast and Exonium Carts will occur and will save their cooldowns for those events. A good tank will also have cooldown ready for kiting adds to blue circles.

This point about anticipating and playing proactively generalizes to all three roles. All boss fights have at least some RNG elements in them. Having said that, the same boss fights are largely predictable. Doing a raid is analogous to playing in an orchestra. You'll play better if you know what to expect, rather than having to react every time you pull. Good raiders will know when to expect certain mechanics and will tune their rotation, offensive, and defensive cooldowns accordingly.

A little pro tip for Vanguard/Powertech tanking that is an exception to the "don't open with a taunt rule." If you have the 192/198 four piece set bonus, then it is actually better if you open with a taunt. With that set bonus,, and with a talent that procs your Stockstrike/Rocket Punch off its cooldown, you can shave up to 6 seconds off your single target taunt cooldown if you open with a taunt and use Stockstrike/Rocket Punch every time it's available. This means that if you space your taunts correctly, you will have 18 straight seconds of guaranteed aggro. That should be plenty of time to secure threat.

Healing
Just a small point here, since I don't want to dog pile the OP on his comments regarding healing. While it is true that overhealing is generally undesirable, some amount of overhealing is needed for Scoundrel/Operative healing. Scondrel/Operative healing has always been about managing HoTs. You have to keep your HoTs up in anticipation of incoming damage, so that your HoTs will heal your target while he/she is taking damage. Applying HoTs after a target has taken significant damage can often be too little, too late. As such, keeping HoTs up will result in some inevitable overhealing.

I want to reiterate the point that I made earlier about anticipation. Good healers, just like any other role, will know the fight and know when to expect incoming burst damage, and will plan their heals accordingly. Good healers always play proactively in this sense.
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Island_Jedi's Avatar


Island_Jedi
03.11.2015 , 02:18 PM | #15
Yes the guide was written before 3.0 and is intended more for newer players not veterans. The healing section especially changed a lot after 3.0. That section needs to be edited a bit. Ty for the feedback though.

Island_Jedi's Avatar


Island_Jedi
03.11.2015 , 02:23 PM | #16
Quote: Originally Posted by Alucardess View Post
I severely disagree with your definitions of proactive and reactive CDs. There is no discernable difference between DCDs. There is however, a difference in playstyle.
Reactive CDs in no way turn you into a brickwall more than proactive DCDs smooth out healing. There is simply knowing when and where to pop your DCDs. You didn't even specify damage type for certain DCDs.
This guide is somewhat passable for noobs in the most general sense, but if you're looking to get better at raiding, this guide is meh at best.
I guess technically your right, you want to be proactive with all cooldowns, but some are more reserved for specific boss mechanics then others. Saberward and reactive shield for example are usually saved for key moments, while smoke grenade and saber reflect are kinda just thrown out more often, except saber reflect is a bit more reactive then the smoke bomb. enure and adrenaline rush are examples of reactive cooldowns if you want to define it that way. Medpacs are also a reactive cooldown.

So I severly disagree with your overreaction to the post. I do think adding damage types would be good though, so ty for that.

Island_Jedi's Avatar


Island_Jedi
03.11.2015 , 02:24 PM | #17
Quote: Originally Posted by yucu View Post
Not a bad overview of endgame for newbies, i'll be recommending it for my DPS and Tank friends if they ask. However I agree with the others, you got your Healers mixed up. Sages being the best at reactive and Commandos being the best at Sustained is the most glaring issue for me right now while Scoundrels being good at Single Target is slightly misleading as they can do better as AoE Healers in most scenarios.
yes I copy and pasted this from the original guide I made. Forgot to update the healing section.

Island_Jedi's Avatar


Island_Jedi
03.11.2015 , 02:39 PM | #18
Quote: Originally Posted by soowonlee View Post
Thanks for writing this guide. While we may quibble over details, any attempt at trying to improve the raiding ability of the community is always welcome.
This was an attempt to help with the problems the "sm warriors" are having. My writing style and explanations are very simple and easy to understand. I have seen some very technical guides, that are written very roboticly making them technically accurate, but a hard read. It is very noob friendly this guide. There are some technical problems in the healing section but honestly even with the typos on single target vs AOE a brand new healer can learn a thing or two.

If your a progressive raider then I would recommend dufly or the forums for your class specifically. This guide is simply meant for newer players. Elitist that are not helping the community with your toxic L2P comments and inability to provide practical help, can shove it. You dont like my guide well guess what its not for you, its for the noobs. Get off my back Iam trying to help. TY Sawonlee there will always be haters.

Island_Jedi's Avatar


Island_Jedi
03.11.2015 , 03:06 PM | #19
Quote: Originally Posted by Azzrayel View Post
Well written and good guide. Everyone who wants to get into raiding should read this.
I didn't read the whole thing in depth, but I've taken a closer look at healing section, since I've been maining a heal recently and I disagree with a few points. Is it possible you wrote this before 3.0?
I literally changed like four sentances, but ty for that. The healing section should be more accurate now. I was really tired when I posted this and forgot to read the healing section, so .

FerkWork's Avatar


FerkWork
03.11.2015 , 03:27 PM | #20
From a tank perspective, the worst sins I see commited by other tanks in pug runs are:
1) Hoarding taunts like gold or a weapon of last resort instead of using it almost on cool down (You can literally build enough threat up halfway through Bulo to focus on positioning the cleave to clear paths for pirate management instead of trying to hold threat.
2)Opening up with a low threat move (Just because it's cool to open up on the boss with your Saber throw as a Jugg doesn't mean it's a good idea
3) Opening highest threat on a boss that has phases that where the first phase doesn't not include tanking the initial enemy which make it a waste to use (i.e. Using jet charge on Brontes instead of just explosive dart her and saving the charge for the hand)

Good guide for begginers I guess (I've only read snippets of it so far)

As pointed out Op healers were the best single target healer (key word was). Now BW decided they should be raid healers instead.

As a hybrid key binder and clicker I just my style
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