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SelinaK's Avatar


SelinaK
02.03.2013 , 01:59 PM | #31
Quote: Originally Posted by LanaRyra View Post
Well, I'm 14, and for the past 3 years, i've been poked and prodded so many times, i lost count. Had severe stomach pain. The school nurse made a comment that i shouldnt fake stomach pain to get out of class. wonder how she feels now [she actually retired that year]. The school Principle also said i was 'faking' it. After surgery. and tests that no kid would want to go through all in a year.

In the first year around christmas, they found my gallbladder wasnt working, they removed it right before christmas [got home christmas eve day], i got an allergic reaction to a med they had me on, and they told me if i would shut up and stop crying about it, the pain would go away. Yes, that is exactly what you say to a kid who is having trouble seeing and feels like their head is going to explode After the surgery i had an allergic reaction to another med that made me pass out on the floor.

In the end, that wasn't it, and the pain continued. It got so bad, it was really debilitating. Was out of school, had tutors come for 6th and 7th grade, 8th grade was homeschooling, and they could never figure out what was wrong. Still haven't. However, i am now on anti-depressants to try and stop my head communicating with my nerves (stop it from making the pain) and it works a little. They are also using it as just an anti-depressant since what person wouldn't be depressed locked away from the world all the time?
Also, when i was a baby (yes a baby, just about a year old) i got Stevens-Johnson, which destroyed my skin and could have made me blind. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevens...hnson_syndrome explains it [dont look if you can't handle graphic pictures] I got it because the doctors couldn't find out what was originally wrong with me, and filled me up with a bunch of drugs.
EDIT: i feel i should just mention, i also have arthritis.

I should stop going on about all this, and get to the main point. I play games to escape my very harsh reality. The pain is still horrific, and im still always in my house. Through games and the internet, i am able to get the social contact i need to really get by. Plus, i get to have lots of fun while doing that too, and it takes my mind off the pain.
Characters:
Jedi Covenant:
.....Lots. LOL (9 total). Main on all servers is 'Amaine.' amaine on this server is a sorc healer at level 50
Another character on this server im really playing is Mimoso, my Guardian.
Shadowlands:
Amaine, level....45 or 46 commando.
Pot5:
....Suzuki. Low level sniper.

anyways...

As you can see, i have lots of charatcers XD i also have a character on the ebon hawk. i am, as some would say, an altaholic. see everyone around, and its good to see other people like me playing the game.

PS: Amaine means sweet sound in japanese

Oh my god *hughughug* Utterly good luck to you

Just looking in on this thread out of curiousity but had to say that...

Also, I was thinking, what you speak about, it reminds me of this:

on-line gaming are changing people's view of who they are and their place in the world, according to a report for the government's chief scientist, BBC News, 2013-01-21
Quote:
Prof Beddington commissioned the study as part of the Government Office for Science's Foresight programme - the influential Foresight reports look ahead to highlight emerging trends in science and technology with a view to informing policies across government departments.

[..]

the changing nature of identities will have substantial implications for what is meant by communities and by social integration. The study shows that traditional elements that shape a person's identity, such as their religion, ethnicity, job and age are less important than they once were.

Instead, particularly among younger people, their view of themselves is shaped increasingly by on-line interactions of social networks and on online role playing games.

The study found that far from creating superficial or fantasy identities that some critics suggest, in many cases it allowed people to escape the preconceptions of those immediately around them and find their "true" identity. This is especially true of disabled people who told researchers that online gaming enabled them to socialise on an equal footing with others.

"The internet can allow many people to realise their identities more fully, " the authors write. "Some people who have been shy or lonely or feel less attractive discover they can socialise more successfully and express themselves more freely online".
I read these books when I was little cos like you I tended to read and write a lot more than most people my age

wikipedia.org/wiki/The Ship Who Sang and along with that BBC article, it makes me think the future might be one where disabled people will have more of an equaliser to life when so much is in the ethereal.
wikipedia.org/wiki/Donna_Haraway#.22A_Cyborg_Manifesto.22
cyberpunk est mort, vive cyberpunk
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ziphii's Avatar


ziphii
02.03.2013 , 04:58 PM | #32
Quote: Originally Posted by SelinaK View Post
Oh my god *hughughug* Utterly good luck to you

Just looking in on this thread out of curiousity but had to say that...

Also, I was thinking, what you speak about, it reminds me of this:

on-line gaming are changing people's view of who they are and their place in the world, according to a report for the government's chief scientist, BBC News, 2013-01-21

I read these books when I was little cos like you I tended to read and write a lot more than most people my age

wikipedia.org/wiki/The Ship Who Sang and along with that BBC article, it makes me think the future might be one where disabled people will have more of an equaliser to life when so much is in the ethereal.
wikipedia.org/wiki/Donna_Haraway#.22A_Cyborg_Manifesto.22
cyberpunk est mort, vive cyberpunk
This is really cool! I think it's true that a lot of disabled people are able to interact more fully online, and it's a good thing for sure!

SelinaK's Avatar


SelinaK
02.04.2013 , 03:07 AM | #33
'Jamie Ponsonby cannot speak, and for years he was trapped in his own world. But his family taught him to type and now the 13-year-old, who has autism, can not only express himself, but also write poetry', BBC News

Oh and another good fiction book that prophesied this stuff (I sometimes think that science fiction in a way is the sleeping subconscious of humanity as a whole dreaming about what could be until it becomes true) that came to mind as well as Anne McCaffrey's "Ship" series: The Wormholers by Jamila Gavin

'President Barack Obama talks with Stephen Hawking in the Blue Room of the White House before a ceremony presenting him and 15 others the Presidential Medal of Freedom on Aug. 12, 2009. The Medal of Freedom is the nation's highest civilian honor', Wikipedia

When I was googling to find that article, I just found this American one too:
Carly Fleischmann: Autistic Girl Who Used A Computer To Ask For Help [permalink] which actually has a link to her blog, Twitter and stuff, and the original article on "ABC News" has a very big comment thread there
Quote:
when Carly was 11, she was working with two of her therapists when she started to feel sick. Unable to communicate what she needed, she ran to a computer and began to type for the first time.

First she typed the word “H-U-R-T” and then “H-E-L-P” and then she threw up. Her therapists were shocked: They had never specifically taught her those words, and they wondered where she had learned them. Carly’s typing showed them that there was a lot more going on inside her head than they had thought. For the first time she was able to communicate independently. After nine years of intensive therapy, and not much to show for it, Carly was finally emerging out of her silent, secret world.

Because nobody apart from two people had ever seen it, the skeptics were desperate to see proof. Going forward, the plan was to use tough love to get Carly to type. If she wanted something, she had to type for it. And it worked. Several months later, Carly started to type, and what came through her finger, typing one letter at a time, with fluency that no one could believe, was simply remarkable.

Carly: “I am autistic but that is not who I am. Take time to know me, before you judge me. I am cute, funny and like to have fun.”

For the first time, Carly was able to have conversations with her parents, even instant-messaging her father at his office. Her family stopped looking at her as a disabled person and instead met the funny, sassy, intelligent girl that had been trapped inside. They also said they were “horrified” that for most of her life they spoke in front of her as if she wasn’t there.

Carly: “I want people to know that no one is telling me what to say and I don’t have a hand up my butt like a puppet.”

[..]

Dr. Nicole Walton-Allen, an early skeptic, concedes: “In retrospect, it is quite clear that Carly obviously had skills that we were not aware of and she needed a vehicle to express herself.”

[..]

One of the things that makes Carly so unique is her tremendous sense of humor. For instance, this exchange with her therapist:

Barb: “How cute are you?”

Carly: “I’m so cute blind people stop and stare.”

Her brother Matthew is also a favorite target.

Carly: “Matthew smells so bad skunks run and hide.”

Besides her obvious spunk and tenacity, Carly is empathetic and recognizes the love and sacrifice her family has made for her, something she conveyed to her father on his birthday.

Carly: “Dear Dad, I love when you read to me. And I love that you believe in me. I know I am not the easiest kid in the world. However you are always there for me holding my hand and picking me up. I love you.”

“I’ll go through many sleepless nights to hear that. I’ll spend every penny we have to hear that,” Fleischmann says.

He also notes that Carly’s breakthrough was the result of thousands of dollars spent on years of intensive therapy. It’s the kind of money most families unfortunately could never afford to spend on their autistic children.

A year after we first met Carly, she is happier, calmer and more independent. She also has her own internet blog and twitters regularly, answering questions from people all over North America about her experience with autism.
It really worries me when I read about stuff like City of Heroes being shut down, because I wonder how many kid's worlds they were using to learn in got destroyed. :/ I think in many ways games are things the world has quite took for granted in how utterly wide-reaching they are changing our society (not always for the better if not in moderation though of course) in ways that we're only just beginning to understand on a sociological level, I'm going to link that other BBC article again just because.

I've worked with specialeffect.org.uk and they are a very worthy charity
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vadess's Avatar


vadess
02.04.2013 , 03:36 PM | #34
I have a form of autism called aspergers syndrome, so I see the world a bit differently. SWTOR, in many ways by accident, has helped me to cope and live with my aspergers a lot more than I did before SWTOR came along. I wrote a blog article explaining it- http://www.darthnoxaeterna.com/swtor...-sword-part-1/
To Cipher the SIS
Have 7 days subscription, and a free character transfer on me: http://www.swtor.com/r/yM6Njk

BenjaminminU's Avatar


BenjaminminU
02.04.2013 , 03:56 PM | #35
I have pervasive developmental disorder, which is on the autistic spectrum. In real life i always feel like people treat me differently, so its nice that in this game I can just be treated like an equal. I'm not sure how exactly to explain my condition, but i sometimes get quite lonely in real life so logging in and talking to people in game is nice.

Recently i've also been going through depression, and I occasionally get bouts of OCD at work, so i'm not exactly the most healthy person in the world.

I'm on the red eclipse if anyone else here wants to team up sometime.
"Declaration: Assassination protocols active. Greetings, master" - HK-51

DaveMcKnight's Avatar


DaveMcKnight
02.04.2013 , 09:42 PM | #36
I'm autistic and have major depression difficulties. I have yet to actually get through a full playthrough of any character, since I tend to screw up somewhere down the line and I'm not a big fan of PVP. I'm starting to get used to it, but I've been avoiding PVP and flashpoints for a while, since I'm not much of a team player, and I've had a few points where I had idiots involved in a group. By idiots, I mean the types who haven't done the flashpoint before and yet don't listen to the guy who has, even though they recruited him for it....

Anyways, I've got auto-ignore for Group and Guild Invites right now, but at some point I intend to lower it. I play mainly RP, even if there's no actual RP chat....

My current toons on Begeren Colony:

Arturious Jedi Guardian, Level 33, Balmorra (I'm not sure if I'm going to keep this guy)
Kaisan, Sith Jugg, Level 19, Balmorra (Just started this one the other day; I wanted to see what its like playing a Light Side, honor-bound Sith)
Anguiss, Sith Sorc (DPS spec), Level 11, Imperial Fleet

I've got an Imp Agent on a PVE server (can't remember which one). He's a level 9 on Hutta.

Personally, one I'm thinking of just doing and taking through to the end first is a Bounty Hunter; that, or finish Arturious....

I generally avoid grouping for general questing, which people seem intent on trying to do. I don't mind doing it for Heroics and Flashpoints, but I absolutely hate when I get a group invite and take a look at said person and find they're a level 4 when I'm a level 10 or 11, finishing up the starter planet. My first thought is always, "Do they even realize grouping with me will completely screw them over on XP?"

Oh, and beyond the autism and depression, I also have the lovely physical issue of lymphedema, and its a life-long condition. I play RPGs because I can have some semblance of control over that life, whereas in my own life, well, I just exist day by day.

In case you're wondering, the last line was the depression talking.....

If you want to group with one of those characters and are on Begeren Colony server, and AREN"T TOO LOW OR HIGH LEVELED, than just whisper me if you see me. Like I said, group and guild invites are auto-denied right now. Just refer to this post in a whisper.

shava's Avatar


shava
02.05.2013 , 12:46 AM | #37
Hiya, folks! I have temporal lobe epilepsy and wicked bad migraines, neither of which is fully controlled with meds, both of which stem from a brain injury -- probably shellfish poisoning -- back in 2007. Gaming helps me immerse in the game and sort of forget about my body when the migraines get back (but no grouping for me! omg... I get evil and unreliable alas! Good thing I'm a carebear in part!).

So, after a very busy career, I'm writing and caring for my elderly mom (Parkinson's, various -- she's in her early 90s) and gaming a lot of the day. If it weren't for the migraines and all, (well, and the cut in income -- whooosh!) it would seem like a very pleasant early retirement! We live a couple blocks from the bay in a little New England town, all very nice, two aging geek grrls (mom was studying botany at UCLA in the 1930s!).

Both of us are probably on the autism spectrum -- I'm diagnosed ADHD, but am probably further along the spectrum than that (they didn't really diagnose Aspie's among boomer girls -- I didn't even get the ADHD diagnosis until I was 40). Mom's likely ADD/inattentive. I'm highly social, used to be a VP/Marketing and worked in international affairs and various, though. An introvert -- it was all roleplaying, lol! My last position I described as a "human rights LARP."

I've been working online for over 30 years, and feel rather good that I've spent part of that time advocating for digital divide issues including access for low income/disabled folks. Turns out I would need it.
===
/* formerly Ashtara, the only female trandoshan (TKM/scout/sword) on Chilastra */

shava's Avatar


shava
02.05.2013 , 01:04 AM | #38
Quote: Originally Posted by LanaRyra View Post
[COLOR="DeepSkyBlue"]
Also, when i was a baby (yes a baby, just about a year old) i got Stevens-Johnson, which destroyed my skin and could have made me blind.
Oh, that is so scary -- I got that as a reaction to an anti-convulsant medication and it nearly killed me! But it didn't reach my eyes either. I thought I was going to burn to death and then I thought I was going to itch to death for weeks. You poor thing! And I was in my 50s, so at least I could understand what was going on pretty much... But that's why they can't medicate my seizures fully -- there are whole swaths of drugs they are afraid to try me on because it might kill me, because so many are in the same general family (Stevens-Johnson being an allergic reaction -- you get it once, it will generally nearly kill you and the second time it just does.)

A lot of me looks like I have reverse freckles -- places where the skin is white and wrinkly in tiny speckles from no pigment where it was burned. Most people would never notice it unless they really looked closely, or touched the skin -- I'm a redhead, before I went gray, so my skin is pretty pale and what's not white freckles is tan or freckle-freckles, so it's really lizardy, in a way. Maybe Qyzen would like it. But happily, none of the burns were on my face much where it shows, that didn't heal up well. I took much better care of those!

But just so you know, you might not have gotten it because they loaded you up with drugs -- people can get SJS just from taking a tab of Ibuprofen. It's not discriminatory about what you get a reaction to, or how many drugs are in your system, or how exotic the drug is. So blaming the doctors or the weirdness of your health issues isn't something to hold onto. It's just a tragic horrible thing no matter why it happens.
===
/* formerly Ashtara, the only female trandoshan (TKM/scout/sword) on Chilastra */

FreePrometheus's Avatar


FreePrometheus
02.05.2013 , 01:37 PM | #39
Epilepsy that makes me have auras (kind of pre-warnings to seizures that manifest in various forms) That last persistenly throughout the day, and seizures (petit-mal) SW helps me ground myself. I mostly forget about all the weird stuff that the auras are doing when i'm concentrating on the game.
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster at your side, kid. - Han Solo
my ally is the Force, and a powerful ally it is. Life creates it, makes it grow. Its energy surrounds us and binds us. - Yoda

vadess's Avatar


vadess
02.06.2013 , 12:39 PM | #40
Quote: Originally Posted by FreePrometheus View Post
Epilepsy that makes me have auras (kind of pre-warnings to seizures that manifest in various forms) That last persistenly throughout the day, and seizures (petit-mal) SW helps me ground myself. I mostly forget about all the weird stuff that the auras are doing when i'm concentrating on the game.
Wow. I always assumed people with epilepsy avoided video games because the changes in light and fast movement can cause seizures. Nice to see that in some ways some games do help. Glad to see you on SWTOR .
To Cipher the SIS
Have 7 days subscription, and a free character transfer on me: http://www.swtor.com/r/yM6Njk