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Run As Admin Is Unacceptable

First BioWare Post First BioWare Post

Redcorn's Avatar


Redcorn
07.11.2012 , 11:02 AM | #1
You guys have done a fairly good job clearing up glaring issues, and I commend you for that. I know you are not the dev team, but I have nowhere else to speak my mind.

Running SWTOR with Admin privileges is unacceptable from a security and inter-operability standpoint.

I never run my PC with Administration privilege unless I must, and that is mostly for initial load of software and hardware. Your programming in this regard is very 1990s and BH/EA should be ashamed.

Beyond the security aspects or insecurity aspects of this practice it also causes problems with other hardware and programs that I use in conjunction with SWTOR. Since I am running the program as admin the program works as if the admin had logged into the system. For instance, the combat log files are found in the admin documents folder and not the user's document folder that I am logged in as. TeamSpeak must run as Admin if I am to use it while in SWTOR or it simply will not work. My G13 keyboard/pad fails to key connect to TeamSpeak because I am logged in as one user and the Game is logged in as admin.

The very frustrating thing is that there is no good reason that I know of for this situation to be needed. I am not a big programmer, and I don't know if you guys have a reason such as hacking prevention, but at the same time, if you need admin privilege for that it is beyond intrusive.

So, could you please explain the need,, if there is a need, to run SWTOR as admin?

Will BH/EA work to rectify this situation?

Cerimon's Avatar


Cerimon
07.11.2012 , 01:30 PM | #2 This is the last staff post in this thread.  
Greetings Redcorn,

The game does need to run with administrator privileges and this is unlikely to change. Running Setpoint and Teamspeak with admin rights may help resolve the problem you are seeing. As you may be aware, we are unable to troubleshoot third party products with regard to interoperability with administrator privileges.

We do hope you can get your setup working while using admin rights.

Cerimon | BioWare Customer Service - Forum Support

Benjiole's Avatar


Benjiole
07.11.2012 , 02:19 PM | #3
How is it bad programming? If you install something to program files, especially MMO's, then the game needs elevated permissions to write to folders, and to create logs.

CKNairb's Avatar


CKNairb
07.11.2012 , 03:29 PM | #4
Quote: Originally Posted by Benjiole View Post
How is it bad programming? If you install something to program files, especially MMO's, then the game needs elevated permissions to write to folders, and to create logs.
Because Microsoft created The Program Data folder and /%user%/AppData/ program folders specifically for that purpose. Not for user data and consistently changed data.

If the program needs to change information or temp store information, they are to go to the above folders, NOT Program Files, and Program Files X86
Blighton
Sith Assassin

darkapprentice's Avatar


darkapprentice
07.11.2012 , 03:32 PM | #5
how is running as admin a 1990's thing when that wasn't even common, if even at all possible except on a small number of operating systems?
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CKNairb's Avatar


CKNairb
07.11.2012 , 03:35 PM | #6
Quote: Originally Posted by darkapprentice View Post
how is running as admin a 1990's thing when that wasn't even common, if even at all possible except on a small number of operating systems?
Run as Admin has been around since start of XP, which was around 1999-2000 and even Windows 2000 to a degree, the UAC dialog was started in Windows Vista and only suposed to be used under rare conditions, not whenever somebody wants to play a Video Game.

SWTOR uses it as it needs to use multiple processes that need to talk to each other for DRM.
Blighton
Sith Assassin

Benjiole's Avatar


Benjiole
07.11.2012 , 03:38 PM | #7
Actually the UAC is there to stop idiots changing stuff, and downloading junk they dont know about.

Most people just drop the UAC level so they dont have to bother with it anymore.

Plus theres no reason to complain. All you need to do is right click the shortcut, go to compatibility and click run as admin. From then on, it will always run as admin.

CKNairb's Avatar


CKNairb
07.11.2012 , 03:50 PM | #8
Quote: Originally Posted by Benjiole View Post
Actually the UAC is there to stop idiots changing stuff, and downloading junk they dont know about.

Most people just drop the UAC level so they dont have to bother with it anymore.

Plus theres no reason to complain. All you need to do is right click the shortcut, go to compatibility and click run as admin. From then on, it will always run as admin.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/l...px#BKMK_WhatIs
What is User Account Control?

User Account Control (UAC) is a security component that enables users to perform common tasks as non-administrators (called standard users in Windows*Vista), and as administrators without having to switch users, log off, or use Run As. User accounts that are members of the local Administrators group run most applications as a standard user. By separating user and administrator functions, UAC helps users move toward using standard user rights by default.

When an administrator logs on to a computer that is running Windows*7 or Windows*Vista, the user is assigned two separate access tokens. Access tokens, which contain a user's group membership and authorization and access control data, are used by the Windows operating system to control what resources and tasks the user can access. The access control model in earlier Windows operating systems did not include any failsafe checks to ensure that users truly wanted to perform a task that required their administrative access token. As a result, malicious software could install on users' computers without notifying the users. (This is sometimes referred to as a "silent" installation.)

Even more damaging, because the user is an administrator, the malicious software could use the administrator's access control data to infect core operating system files, and in some instances, become nearly impossible to remove.

it is NOT a good idea to disable UAC, anybody that says otherwise does not know what they are doing
Blighton
Sith Assassin

Benjiole's Avatar


Benjiole
07.11.2012 , 03:59 PM | #9
Quote: Originally Posted by CKNairb View Post
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/l...px#BKMK_WhatIs
What is User Account Control?

User Account Control (UAC) is a security component that enables users to perform common tasks as non-administrators (called standard users in Windows*Vista), and as administrators without having to switch users, log off, or use Run As. User accounts that are members of the local Administrators group run most applications as a standard user. By separating user and administrator functions, UAC helps users move toward using standard user rights by default.

When an administrator logs on to a computer that is running Windows*7 or Windows*Vista, the user is assigned two separate access tokens. Access tokens, which contain a user's group membership and authorization and access control data, are used by the Windows operating system to control what resources and tasks the user can access. The access control model in earlier Windows operating systems did not include any failsafe checks to ensure that users truly wanted to perform a task that required their administrative access token. As a result, malicious software could install on users' computers without notifying the users. (This is sometimes referred to as a "silent" installation.)

Even more damaging, because the user is an administrator, the malicious software could use the administrator's access control data to infect core operating system files, and in some instances, become nearly impossible to remove.

it is NOT a good idea to disable UAC, anybody that says otherwise does not know what they are doing
Actually if you practice safe browsing habits, and dont go to random sites, plus utilise good firewall and malware/anti virus software, then it makes no real difference. It's there as an added security feature, but what MS don't tell you is that there are multiple ways around UAC, and some virii/malware can get around it or disable it. Thats why UAC has been patched a lot of times in recent months.

CKNairb's Avatar


CKNairb
07.11.2012 , 04:09 PM | #10
Quote: Originally Posted by Benjiole View Post
Actually if you practice safe browsing habits, and dont go to random sites, plus utilise good firewall and malware/anti virus software, then it makes no real difference. It's there as an added security feature, but what MS don't tell you is that there are multiple ways around UAC, and some virii/malware can get around it or disable it. Thats why UAC has been patched a lot of times in recent months.
Oh i agree, but A hole in the door letting water trickle in is no reason to remove the door all together letting more rain in
Blighton
Sith Assassin