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How good could you wield a double bladed saber or 2 sabers in RL?

STAR WARS: The Old Republic > English > STAR WARS Discussion
How good could you wield a double bladed saber or 2 sabers in RL?

sithlordcip's Avatar


sithlordcip
04.29.2012 , 02:26 AM | #1
So many people are playing assasin and marauder, was wondering, if you would have atleast a training doublebladed saber or 2 sabers, how good could you wield them IRL without choping off your limbs?

I think 2 sabers are way harder to wield than a doublebladed saber.
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Rhyltran's Avatar


Rhyltran
04.29.2012 , 03:20 AM | #2
Quote: Originally Posted by sithlordcip View Post
So many people are playing assasin and marauder, was wondering, if you would have atleast a training doublebladed saber or 2 sabers, how good could you wield them IRL without choping off your limbs?

I think 2 sabers are way harder to wield than a doublebladed saber.
The question is irrelevant. Real life is very different than the star wars universe. In Star Wars the Jedi have the force. In real life you'll be hard pressed to learn how to wield two swords correctly let alone two lightsabers. "Dual Wielding" swords wasn't very popular.

Brimmer's Avatar


Brimmer
04.29.2012 , 03:40 AM | #3
It's easy to dual wield swords, however It's very difficult to dual wield sword effectively :P

You need a lot of skill / endurance to dual wield since you'll use up a lot more energy than a person using a single blade. Since they will be able to put more force behind each blow, versus your multiple blows at a weaker strength.

Kinda silly to dual wield unless you're very skilled, it's vastly easier to use a single blade.
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ObiWanBaikonur's Avatar


ObiWanBaikonur
04.29.2012 , 05:16 AM | #4
The only thing that comes to mind for me when I think of dual wielding is the main gauche that was used to parry incoming blows during the swashbuckling days of renaissance Europe!

Did anyone historically "dual wield" in real life? (Anyone being a collective here, i.e. Musketeers, Vikings, Samurai, etc.)
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-squiddy-'s Avatar


-squiddy-
04.29.2012 , 05:19 AM | #5
The benefit of dual wielding in Kendo might be a good comparison. Even though it is harder to do, it is much more difficult for a single wielding opponent to defend against your attacks, and your bouts end much quicker, in the end saving you energy you expended using two swords.

Opponents sometimes don't know what to do and in a lot of cases and just go limp, suffering decision paralysis, when they face dual wielders in bouts. You can sometimes see you have already won before the first blow is struck.

Dual wielders IRL like Miyamoto Musashi often fought more than one opponent at a time. Dual wielding helps with crowd control in a way single sword wielding does not accomplish. It is more difficult for a single swordsman to stand against five others without two blades to maintain a threat zone.

Having said that though, the number of times I have hit myself in the back of the head with a shinai or bokken, even after 15 years of Kendo and Iaido, I think the likelihood of me dual wielding a light sabre and surviving more than a year or two, would be slim.

bionamaster's Avatar


bionamaster
04.29.2012 , 10:00 AM | #6
Quote: Originally Posted by ObiWanBaikonur View Post
The only thing that comes to mind for me when I think of dual wielding is the main gauche that was used to parry incoming blows during the swashbuckling days of renaissance Europe!

Did anyone historically "dual wield" in real life? (Anyone being a collective here, i.e. Musketeers, Vikings, Samurai, etc.)
Well, the Samurai would wield their Katana (their longsword, used for slashing, typically) and their Wakizashi (A shortsword, used for stabbing). But, if they were to wield two Katanas (which I don't think ever historically happened) they would need immense strength in both arms.
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-squiddy-'s Avatar


-squiddy-
04.29.2012 , 11:23 AM | #7
Miyamoto Musashi, mentioned earlier, developed a technique called "Niten'ichi" dedicated to dual sword wielding. Most pictures of him show him wielding the shorter Wakizashi, but his writings do mention dual Katana use.

A lot of the history written about him has been fictionalised over time so it is hard to say, but his book "The book of Five Rings" explains that the off hand isn't used for much in combat anyway, you may as well have your second sword out. It's been a long time since I've read it, but it's worth a look.

In a lot of cases you are using the main hand for attack and the offhand for defence like a sword and shield of European knights. The other cool thing about the second sword though, in one on one combat, is that you can deflect with one and then use the gap you just made to strike the killing blow. You can do this with one sword, but it's faster and less obvious with two.

After you spend a few years practicing with two swords the strength and stamina doesn't become an issue. You get more worn out in practice than you ever would in a short bout. In practice I like to mess with my opponents by reversing the grip of one or both shinai, holding them with the tip to the floor and the hilt up.

I don't think lightsabers would weigh as much as a katana though either somehow

KorinHyvek's Avatar


KorinHyvek
04.29.2012 , 11:27 AM | #8
I could be wrong, but I believe the Sai could be dual wielded (although the Sai is actually more of a bludgeoning weapon). Also, some later forms of swordplay used a main gauche, a small dagger in the offhand used for both defense and slipping through an opponent's blocks.

As for double bladed sabers... You can use a staff somethign like a double bladed saber might be used, but ultimately most styles go for a more sensible two handed grip that offers greater reach and striking power.
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jarjarloves's Avatar


jarjarloves
04.29.2012 , 11:33 AM | #9
the problem with weilding lightsabers in general is the fact that if you touch the blade you lose what ever part touched it.

In real life if you mess up and the sword hits you at worst you might get cut or if you hit the flat of the blade then nothing. You accidently touch a light saber you could potentially cut part of your body off.

-squiddy-'s Avatar


-squiddy-
04.29.2012 , 11:40 AM | #10
There are a bunch of non sword dual wielding techniques too from stick fighting, tonfa, nunchucks etc...

To me it has always made more sense to have both hands used vs one hand just guiding the main weapon.

I get more reach with one handed wielding than with two. The second hand on the hilt actually reduces the reach.

I've also seen plenty of people open up their hands and almost sever fingers sheathing their weapon. I've heard of one young lady who was practicing drawing and then resheathing her sword in her room in the dark who put the tip through her hip instead of back in the scabbard.