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How likely will it be for a Jedi/Sith to dual-wield?

STAR WARS: The Old Republic > English > Story and Lore
How likely will it be for a Jedi/Sith to dual-wield?

Bloodfount's Avatar


Bloodfount
02.07.2012 , 11:57 AM | #11
well in Episode II there was a bit of dual wielding going on. Jedi are protectors though. How many police officers do you see carrying two pistols?
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Verrell's Avatar


Verrell
02.07.2012 , 11:58 AM | #12
Quote: Originally Posted by LordSoviet View Post
aayla secura uses 2.. and shes in the clone wars
I havent watched that, unfortunately. In the clone wars did she have two sabers as her own, that she always walked around with, or did she just pick up and use someone else's lightsabers in dual-wielding?

Example, I know Kit Fitso dual wields at one point, but for the most part he walks around with one. He just used one of Grievouses.
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LordSoviet's Avatar


LordSoviet
02.07.2012 , 12:02 PM | #13
she wasnt shown a ton.

AngelousWang's Avatar


AngelousWang
02.07.2012 , 12:08 PM | #14
Lore reasons for one handing.

1. Jedi only (supposed to) defend themselves and others, dual lightsaber fighting is more offensive and aggressive so just from a Jedi moral view it frowned upon to use dual lightsaber, one is more than enough for defense.

2. It's harder to use the force with something in your hand/s (well really it's not, but it is for most movie force users as they think it is), therefore most Jedi like to have a free hand so they can more quickly/easily use the force when required. Even Yoda for example has to put his lightsaber away to use the force to save Anakin and Kenobi.

3. Power, as Lightsabers are weightless all the power (hit force) comes from the user, dual wielders therefore sacrifice hit and defense power (as they can only use one arm strenght per saber) for a multi point attack. This make fighting Djem-So or Juyo users hard, as you would have to avoid blows rather than try to block them. - This is one of the reasons Vader was so dominating, nobody could match the power of his robotic arms, he would just power-brake through everyone defenses with ease.
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kainsec's Avatar


kainsec
02.07.2012 , 01:13 PM | #15
DW wouldn't normally be practical for the most part. The amount of focus and effort to keep from bisecting yourself and it's weak defense against forms that use the force to enhance physical strength make it infeasible to only only half invest in training if they where going to use it as a main style. Jedi have many non-combat duties which prevents many of them from being weapon masters so for them it would probably be vary rare to see many of them trained in anything more than situational dual wielding and defense against dual wielders.

Sith I imagine it would be slightly more common only bc Sith don't act as intergalactic fed ex and have a much more rigorous (read potentially fatal) combat and survival training program over diplomatic and mediator training.

For a good video that shows all 3 of the primary weapons (single blade, double bladed, and dual wield) go http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfa-Pa5IQLg

After the blade barrier he forms which is an special effect that initial assault was fast and brutal but any follow up he made was inflexible and clumsy compared to the earlier single blade style and the lacked speed and ferocity of the double blade later. While he is a real person with no benefit of the force it gives an idea of why DW still wouldn't be common compared to the other 2 styles which don't require constant aid of the force.
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popober's Avatar


popober
02.07.2012 , 01:55 PM | #16
There is a "form" or technique that utilizes DW, it's called Jar'kai. and it's supposedly a VERY hard skill to learn, even masters have trouble with it. One notable example is Assajj Ventress(not sure about the spellin) adn it seems plausible as you're only really carrying 2 relatively small hunks of metal as opposed to a full sword.

A glaring weakness for this form though is that without working out your arm muscles, you lack the defensive capability of a regular duelist when someone keeps battering at your sabers.

In real life terms, I'd agree with people here that DW is very dangerous and in western swordplay, you don't use a full sword in your offhand. Instead you utilize either a small sword, parrying, dagger, or even a cloak. However there is a style taht is thought in the Philippines that teaches the use of 2 weapons called Arnis, however this art uses wooden rattan sticks instead of swords. I believe Kali and Eskrima also teaches dual wielding and it's not that "think of them as part of the same weapon" crap either, they teach you to use to weapons, so use both of them.

Quething's Avatar


Quething
02.07.2012 , 03:33 PM | #17
Quote: Originally Posted by LyriaFrost View Post
That's not entirely true. The florentine fighting style taught how to use sword and dagger, and use both offensively. The niten ichi-ryu style developed by Musashi included a dual-wielding style as well, using a katana in one hand and a wakizashi in the other, using both offensively. Wing chun sword style also can focus on twin butterfly swords (which would be classified as 'shortswords', really).

While historically it's nowhere NEAR as common as it is in fantasy/movies, it wasn't something that was completely alien, nor was it limited to two light weapons.

*adjusts her nerd glasses*
Eh, wakizashi and butterfly swords are still pretty light in terms of SW weapons; lightsabers seem about comparable to bastard swords. (I did like that in KotOR, there were short lightsabers suitable for offhand use. It was a shame you could just equip a full mainhand saber anyway and take the -2 hit by the time you hit level 10, rendering the light offhand concept pointless.)

Nevertheless, fair point: the basic concept isn't impossible or unheard of given the right equipment and training. Which really just makes me want to see even more diverse or complex fighting styles. Lightkukri. Lightsai. Light meteor hammers!

gibmachine's Avatar


gibmachine
02.07.2012 , 06:08 PM | #18
Frankly I think they wanted their characters to simply stick to the classic look.

Also, if you ask me, 2 weapons are somewhat impractical because not only you have to develop enough sheer strength to actually utilize them properly, you also don't have a free hand to grab on to things etc. You can do force push / pull / lightning, you name it, with a thumb and 2 fingers with other 2 fingers being wrapped around the hilt but when it comes to supporting yourself upon falling or things like that, you're unable to actually do it.

Valenhil's Avatar


Valenhil
02.07.2012 , 06:27 PM | #19
Forget how swordsmanship works in real life. Lightsaber combat is not actually based on the tool, but on the force. The stance and mindset you adopt while fighting, or "Form", defines how your abilities will translate into the lightsaber.
Shii-cho, Makashi, Soresu, Ataru are examples of jedi forms in battle, and knights would adapt accordingly. Some forms work better with two lightsabers, some with a single. But none are "superior" to any other.

Daraco's Avatar


Daraco
02.07.2012 , 07:58 PM | #20
Quote: Originally Posted by Valenhil View Post
Forget how swordsmanship works in real life. Lightsaber combat is not actually based on the tool, but on the force. The stance and mindset you adopt while fighting, or "Form", defines how your abilities will translate into the lightsaber.
Shii-cho, Makashi, Soresu, Ataru are examples of jedi forms in battle, and knights would adapt accordingly. Some forms work better with two lightsabers, some with a single. But none are "superior" to any other.
Agreed, While lore wise there are not many Force users that actually dual wield their sabers. And in real life dual wielding is for the most part impractical because of human psychical limitations, but Lore provides more then enough examples of how they could use the force to augment their psychical abilities to the point where those limitations could be extended to make dual wielding practical. I mean how often do you see swordsman flipping around each other or throwing rocks with their minds in a fight in real life?

The Point of the thread is why would we see MORE dual wielding force users than at any other point in the universes time line?

The real answer is, Bioware took a creative licence when it comes to this and honestly for most people its a draw to use an "EXOTIC" combat style as opposed to the standard one everyone is already familiar with.

For a more lore opinion,i would think the off handed weapon would be more of a defensive option than a offensive one, and if you look at the damage output, your off hand saber does do significantly less damage than your main hand. In fact i think dual wielding classes should be given a slight parry bonus