Please upgrade your browser for the best possible experience.

Chrome Firefox Internet Explorer
×

Sith code only works for the absolute top of the society.

STAR WARS: The Old Republic > English > Story and Lore
Sith code only works for the absolute top of the society.

LystAP's Avatar


LystAP
01.16.2012 , 11:13 PM | #21
Quote: Originally Posted by GreatKingBrad View Post
The "Through victory my chains are broken" actually makes some sense. Yes, you're a slave/servant/etc. to your master, but the whole goal is to kill your master. When you finally gain enough power, which the code tells you how to do, you can kill your master and "break your chains".
But then you start worrying about your own servants plotting to kill you. You can be just as chained to a master, as to your own apprentices. Even if you don't take an apprentice, as long as there is someone to covet your power; they'll try to kill you and take what you own eventually.

Going from this line of reasoning, the only method which will really liberate a Sith is to simply kill everyone else in the galaxy. This is probably why Sith view killing so casually.

VoxTheHero's Avatar


VoxTheHero
01.16.2012 , 11:15 PM | #22
Quote: Originally Posted by Krusedullfaen View Post
One could argue that the Jedi are always chained, whereas the Sith at least have the option of breaking free, if they have the strength and will.

On the other hand, the majority of Jedi seem to be content with their ways and I can understand why actually. When it comes down to it, I'd rather make the sacrifices necessary to become Jedi than live with the constant stress of being Sith.

Besides, the Jedi code is misunderstood by many, it's not nearly as oppressive as it seems. It's not about repressing emotion but controlling it, rather than it controlling you as is the way of Sith.

As someone who strives to be as reasonable and objective as I possibly can be (I am only human, but I do try) I find a lt more sense in the Jedi code than the Sith code. The Sith are all about relatively short lived gratification whereas the Jedi as more about lasting serentiy, which to me sounds like the best option overall.

But, both sides are extremes, they both have flaws. Overall though I would say the Jedi code is actually much more liberating than the Sith if you take a moment to consider it. Is a Sith that constantly has to be on his guard really more free than the man who lives a life of serenity, not bothered by the restrictions put on his life?
Wholeheartedly agree, brother.
Squadron 367 Veteran
My DevArt
Karnel Fass: Jedi Guardian

tausra's Avatar


tausra
01.16.2012 , 11:47 PM | #23
I think most everyone here is taking the code too literally. The purpose of the Sith code is ambition and self-actualization.

Peace is a Lie, there is only passion Peace causes stagnation; do not settle for what you are find your passion to grow and improve.

Through passion, I gain strength. Use your passions to motivate you; take strength in the things you enjoy and use them to grow.

Through strength, I gain power. Now that you're being guided by your passions and have an understanding of yourself, you have power over yourself.

Through power, I gain victory. By possessing power over your desires, and knowing your limitations you have gained victory over those desires. You can control yourself, because you know yourself.

Through victory, my chains are broken. By knowing yourself and conquering your desires you become free of all the entanglements and bindings that would hold back a less "actualized" person. Moral quandaries are no longer difficult, because you are beyond doubt and indecision.

The Force shall free me. The Force, desire, ambition, all of these things have freed you from you stagnation and mediocrity.

Taking the code too literally leads to paranoia and infighting, while taking it too theoretically means no progress is made. A Sith must be Lucifernian in his actions, selfish and driven to succeed.
"Sith, children of Sith, warriors everywhere, I declare a new Empire, open to all who long for conquest, freedom from inhibition and the right to follow their passions." -Emperor Malgus

Krusedullfaen's Avatar


Krusedullfaen
01.17.2012 , 12:28 AM | #24
Quote: Originally Posted by tausra View Post
I think most everyone here is taking the code too literally. The purpose of the Sith code is ambition and self-actualization.

Peace is a Lie, there is only passion Peace causes stagnation; do not settle for what you are find your passion to grow and improve.

Through passion, I gain strength. Use your passions to motivate you; take strength in the things you enjoy and use them to grow.

Through strength, I gain power. Now that you're being guided by your passions and have an understanding of yourself, you have power over yourself.

Through power, I gain victory. By possessing power over your desires, and knowing your limitations you have gained victory over those desires. You can control yourself, because you know yourself.

Through victory, my chains are broken. By knowing yourself and conquering your desires you become free of all the entanglements and bindings that would hold back a less "actualized" person. Moral quandaries are no longer difficult, because you are beyond doubt and indecision.

The Force shall free me. The Force, desire, ambition, all of these things have freed you from you stagnation and mediocrity.

Taking the code too literally leads to paranoia and infighting, while taking it too theoretically means no progress is made. A Sith must be Lucifernian in his actions, selfish and driven to succeed.
Unfortunately for the Sith (And fortunately for everyone else) you are much smarter than most of they are.

Iaius's Avatar


Iaius
01.17.2012 , 12:43 AM | #25
Quote: Originally Posted by tausra View Post
I think most everyone here is taking the code too literally. The purpose of the Sith code is ambition and self-actualization.

Peace is a Lie, there is only passion Peace causes stagnation; do not settle for what you are find your passion to grow and improve.

Through passion, I gain strength. Use your passions to motivate you; take strength in the things you enjoy and use them to grow.

Through strength, I gain power. Now that you're being guided by your passions and have an understanding of yourself, you have power over yourself.

Through power, I gain victory. By possessing power over your desires, and knowing your limitations you have gained victory over those desires. You can control yourself, because you know yourself.

Through victory, my chains are broken. By knowing yourself and conquering your desires you become free of all the entanglements and bindings that would hold back a less "actualized" person. Moral quandaries are no longer difficult, because you are beyond doubt and indecision.

The Force shall free me. The Force, desire, ambition, all of these things have freed you from you stagnation and mediocrity.

Taking the code too literally leads to paranoia and infighting, while taking it too theoretically means no progress is made. A Sith must be Lucifernian in his actions, selfish and driven to succeed.
Line 1: Peace causes stagnation? As my consular said very early on, peace is what allows civilizations to flourish. Warfare destroys the infrastructure required to do anything productive.

Line 2: Blindly following one's passions without detachment and restraint is childlike. It's a desire for instant gratification and leads one to make mistakes. That is not strength; far from it.

Line 3: How does following one's passions lead to self-mastery? It seems you're at cross-purposes here, because flailing about to satisfy wants isn't very controlled at all.

Line 4: As noted above, I think this chain of reasoning doesn't stand up to close examination. How does giving in to passion lead to power over one's self? A lot of the Sith we see have very little restraint.

Line 5: Yeah, uh, it's Jedi who avoid attachment. That's the point of their Code.

Line 6: At this point I'm convinced that you actually decided to perform an "inside job" and discredit the Sith philosophy under the guise of justifying it, and thereby proving that the Jedi way is superior after all. Well done.

Vladearg's Avatar


Vladearg
01.17.2012 , 12:51 AM | #26
Quote: Originally Posted by Maaruin View Post
It seems that most Sith are mainly concerned about the middle lines of the code.

..., I gain strength.
Through strength, I gain power.
Through power,...


They don't follow their passions anymore but use them to gain power. It's all about power. Unlimeted power.
At least that seems to be the main concern of most of the Sith most of the time. Especially in the Empire.

Few Sith achieved the victory they longed for. And I would say (nearly) none of the great Sith Lords was ever "set free". Would you consider Palpatine as free? He was controlled by his hunger for power and his arrogance. And his duty was bound to the fate of his Empire. Would you consider Bane as free? Afaik he thought about him self as a servent to the goals of the Sith. He infested his whole life in an Apprentice who would kill him only that the Sith one day, in the far future, may rule the galaxy.
I actually agree with you here.. Thus my clarification of the word "victory".
When we apply sith teachings of the self to how to run an empire.... The latter can limit the former.


Quote:

That may be true. But as a Sith not only the force is a tool for you, every person around you is a tool to. You try to exploit everyone for your needs and every other sith, especially your master, will try the same with you.
I'd rather be a response machine for the force then for a Sith Lord.
But the choice to rebell is always mine.
Your council, your order, your social norms... These are things which you freely allow to bind you and limit your growth.

There are many who rebell against the emperor in spirit. Under the empire, our personal views and philosophies are diverse. But in action... we are united under the emperor for a desire of revenge.
You in the repulblic are uncoordinated in action, but unified in spirit. Unified in spirit in the desire to subvert the self to serve "the good".

If you want to join the force so much, I can help you.
*ignights lightsaber*

subrosian's Avatar


subrosian
01.17.2012 , 12:53 AM | #27
The idea of the Sith Code is that our chains exist in more than just the physical sense. It's not just that you are "enslaved" to your master, it's also that you are enslaved by your own fear, your doubts, your weakness. The actual chain of killing your master is the most obvious one, but on the path to doing so you are breaking other, far less obvious chains.

The harshness of Korriban and the brutality of the Sith Empire is necessary in order to forge new Sith. Anyone who has read Knight Errant is aware that great beauty exists within the Sith Empire, there are worlds that are absolute jewels, but the Sith don't choose them for raising new apprentices. Why? Because people raised in luxury will not become strong.

The Sith Code isn't just benefiting the Emperor, it benefits everyone who struggles to break chains. Through the struggle they gain power, through power they gain victory, and then, only then, are their chains broken. Without the struggle, without the acquisition of power, without victory, it would be irrelevant if they even had a master, they would still be bound by chains just as heavy: gluttony, sloth, weakness, fear.
subrosian
<Epitome>
epitomeraiding.com

ahrimahn's Avatar


ahrimahn
01.17.2012 , 04:10 AM | #28
I always thought that was the point.

Dionlight's Avatar


Dionlight
01.17.2012 , 04:45 AM | #29
Very interesting topic.

I feel like only Light-sided Sith are the only ones who get the meaning behind the Sith code. Me being one of them, I see the code as a reminder to encourage you on your path to "freedom". Freedom being at peace with who you are ; that what you went through made you a better person. You don't have to kill everybody that fails you on you're way to victory, nor kill every person that challenges you. Also the force is your tool to smite your enemies with your passion and the stronger you are, the less likely you will fear or hold hate of anyone because they are beneath your level of experience.


Of course the majority of the Sith feel like abusing the code and think you have to kill just about anything that moves. That the only passion there is is rage and hate and the only way to gain victory and break your chains is to kill your master(s) until you are killed.


Now I like the Sith code because it allows someone to challenge themselves and prove their worth. No one likes to feel like a weak *** b*tch all the time. However the code suffers from infighting and lack of guidance. No Sith should be hated or killed for showing mercy or love to one another to make them a stronger and more restraint person; the Sith code allows it.

Kaydenloss's Avatar


Kaydenloss
01.17.2012 , 08:41 AM | #30
Quote: Originally Posted by Restepor View Post
Not really because a Sith's goal is to become the strongest thing that ever was. Your goal is to take out your master, not to stay under him till death.
this ^ also, the chains do not only apply on your sith master, but on galactic domination as well. This is why the Sith want to conquor.

The answer lies in the question.

It is the Sith's duty to become the absolute top of the society. Those that fail, are deemed unworthy Sith.
Quote:
"Star Wars™: The Old Republic would be completely lost if players couldn’t jump off the rails and just live in the space from time to time."
Damion Schubert Principal Lead Systems Designer