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the original books


Vecke's Avatar


Vecke
01.12.2012 , 06:09 PM | #11
Quote: Originally Posted by Wolfninjajedi View Post
Not to mention it goes more in depth with how Luke became a jedi and you see he was fully trained by ROTJ, the movies can only shove so much into it where with novels you can add so much more because the only thing a writer is limited by imagination.
Totally agree. If someone reads books just for the basics of the plot, I'm not sure why they'd read books at all. Websites can do that about 100 times faster. The novelizations, on the other hand, significantly expand the universe (pun intended) and are well worth reading, in my opinion.

As for the Zahn books... this won't be a popular opinion, but I'll say it anyway...

I liked the Zahn books. They were fun and when they first came out they were pretty much the only EU we had. That said, I honestly don't see them as great works of Star Wars lore. Those books, in my very humble opinion, feel like science fiction books that take place in the Star Wars reality, which isn't science fiction. If you're a fan of pure science fiction, I think you'll like the Zahn books. But if you're a fan of the cowboy side of Star Wars... or the high adventure side of Star Wars... or the mystical side of Star Wars... the Zahn books don't really bring that emotion, for me at least.
"I know."

darth_freefall's Avatar


darth_freefall
01.12.2012 , 06:46 PM | #12
Quote: Originally Posted by Vecke View Post
I disagree entirely. The novel adaptations of the Star Wars movies are very much worth reading. They are by far the best Star Wars novels out there (IMO). They really add to the films.

In Episode IV, you get to know Biggs on a much more personal level.
In the Jedi novelization, the unspoken war going on between Luke and the Emperor on the Death Star is spectacular. And the Jedi novelization really deals with just how close Luke came to the dark side.
And the Episode 3 novelization is a great book and makes Anakin's fall much more realistic.

For me, the movie novelizations fix pretty much every complaint I had with the movies. Well worth reading.
Totally agree, I've read all the novel adaptions of the movies, and i have to say especially in Revenge of the Sith it gives you so much more background information.

I believe at one point they even explain why Obi-Wan was chosen to go after Grievous. That sort of extra detail really gives you a better understanding of what is going on and why.

psychogobstopper's Avatar


psychogobstopper
01.12.2012 , 10:20 PM | #13
Quote: Originally Posted by Morridini View Post
There are no original books, they first made the movies, and then wrote some adaptations that really isn't worth the read.
Star Wars: From the Adventures of Luke Skywalker was actually first published in 1976, prior to the theatrical release of Star Wars. I can't recall the novelizations of The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi all that well, but the prologue and other details in the novelization of the first film do make it worth reading.

Quote: Originally Posted by jarjarloves View Post
prety much this with the exception of Splinter In the Minds Eye which was written before the first movie but they used an early draft of the script as guidance.
While Splinter of the Mind's Eye borrowed some elements from early Star Wars script drafts (the Kaiburr Crystal, for example), it was not written before Star Wars. It was written to provide the basis for a low-budget sequel if the first movie was not financially successful, and thus was published in early 1978.

Intarabus's Avatar


Intarabus
01.13.2012 , 08:52 PM | #14
Quote: Originally Posted by psychogobstopper View Post
While Splinter of the Mind's Eye borrowed some elements from early Star Wars script drafts (the Kaiburr Crystal, for example), it was not written before Star Wars. It was written to provide the basis for a low-budget sequel if the first movie was not financially successful, and thus was published in early 1978.
There is a comic version of it from the early 90ies which I think is very cool. You can see how it would have looked like if Star Wars had failed commercially. Though the story was o.K., Empire strikes back was way better, and not only because of the tricks.
Thought that in this versions SW would have become more Indy-like, no space battles but a lot of jungles and caves, and it had definitely a lighter tone with more "humorous" scenes than TESB.
And it has no Han Solo. Since he was likely to be the best paid actor in SW, this roman/comic hints, that the plannings must have advanced really far.