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How do you get better at Galactic Starfighter?

STAR WARS: The Old Republic > English > Galactic Starfighter
How do you get better at Galactic Starfighter?

Toasted_Coconuts's Avatar


Toasted_Coconuts
12.14.2013 , 11:55 PM | #11
Quote: Originally Posted by Gavin_Kelvar View Post
figure out what components best compliment your piloting skills. Unlike other aspects of TOR there is no one combination that you must use to be the best. What works for one person may not work for you so while recommended builds are a good starting point you should go with whatever works best for you.

and situational awareness! The aware pilot lives longest so pay attention to your minimap!
That's not true, right now there is a build in which a scout can kill any other ship in under 2 seconds using cannons only. Those scout pilots are getting 17 - 25 kills a match. It will be the build that everyone will use, it's going to be the first FOTM.

AdmiralOnasi's Avatar


AdmiralOnasi
12.15.2013 , 12:37 AM | #12
Play. The. Objectives. For the love of God. Play. The. Objectives. Pubs on POT5 are so bad at this it is just profound. The number of bozos that just fly around playing dogfight is just stupid. The number of times I've seen four peeps take a sat and then ALL CHASE OFF AFTER ONE SHIP has to be closing in on 100. And then because they all tunnel visioned on one guy, two more enemies come in and take the sat while everyone is off head hunting. And no matter how nicely or often you remind people not to do it, they do it.

sentawan's Avatar


sentawan
12.15.2013 , 12:40 AM | #13
In "Domination":

1) Closest person to the node wins: There is a "cap" bubble that extends in a sphere around the Satellite (node). The diameter of the sphere is approximately as wide as as the color wings on the satellite, most of the time. However, the closest person, usually a camper stopped in a crevice, will start cap'n the node an enemy cap'er barely gets outside the color wings. If there is no enemy near the satellite, the cap bubble can actually get quite big and extend well away from the node, for friendlies.

2) If a cap'd node starts to flash: You should keep an eye on the UI status of the nodes. If a green one flashes, it means that an enemy is close enough to cap the node. Make sure there is at least one friendly on the node. If not, try to get as close to the node as possible to prevent the enemy from capping. This will mean abandoning a chase and flying straight for the node.

3) Kill gunships first: As long as there is someone on the node to keep it from being taken, move your mouse over distant enemies and push "e" to see if they are a gunship. Try to take an indirect route to get to them. As long as you don't fly straight at them from the direction they are facing (usually the node the are by), you can usually get them off guard.

In General not otherwise mentioned:

1) You turn faster with the mouse up or down than to the side. Use the roll keys (a & d) to orient your ship "into the turn", so that you are pushing the mouse up/down to turn towards the area you want to go.

2) Being on nodes help you learn to fly better: I learned to control my ship really well by weaving on nodes to keep others from cap'n it and kill cap'ers off it. Avoiding crashing into the satellite while going full speed around it is very good practice and helps the team win.

3) Pressing "x" lets you stop: Depending on your speed, your full stop my take a little while. Getting used to how long it takes to stop is a life saver. There are many times you will want to stop and hover in order to take out node campers from "above"/"below" a satellite. Sometimes, it is necessary when weaving a node to be able to stop on it., particularly when the there is a gunship on one side of the node. You have to either stop on the other side or try to weave while los'n. Remember, when you are stopped, you are a sitting duck. Make sure you have cover.

4) Pressing "r" lets you see who has hit you with a weapon: It won't let you see who has a target lock. If you think you have the enemy unaware, lock you missile before hitting him with your lasers. He will try to turn on you , but he can't target you with "r". This may let you get the missile lock off and then let loose with the lasers. Just having a missile lock on someone scares people into objects. Sometimes, you can hold your lock and don't let it go until they pop their engine ability. Then you can catch back up and be able to lock.

Gavin_Kelvar's Avatar


Gavin_Kelvar
12.15.2013 , 02:06 AM | #14
Quote: Originally Posted by Toasted_Coconuts View Post
That's not true, right now there is a build in which a scout can kill any other ship in under 2 seconds using cannons only. Those scout pilots are getting 17 - 25 kills a match. It will be the build that everyone will use, it's going to be the first FOTM.
Ok I'll concede that bit. But other components (engine evasion type for example) are more to playstyle/what you find effective, not what someone else does. the point being it's not as rigid as the ground game where each tree pretty much has a set rotation and gear stats you must use. At least I feel that there's more freedom of choice in GSF than the ground game.

AlrikFassbauer's Avatar


AlrikFassbauer
12.15.2013 , 06:49 AM | #15
Quote: Originally Posted by Nethgilne View Post
Don't be discouraged and start thinking that headsets are instant win. Effective communication and team coordination is a skill just like any other, especially in this game where it is harder to keep track of your teammates than your enemies.

Certainly they have an advantage but its one they have to practice at as a team to put to good use. I'm also willing to bet that the vast majority of players are pugs.
Voice communication isn't really fully needed - if you keep your eyes open and constantly analyse the battlefield, that is.

For example, you can identify groups pretty well by them acting like swarms. Ask yourself the question : Is there a group of enemy fighters crossing the screen ? Moving from one satellite to another ? What does the minimap say ? How much clustered are fighters around satellites ? What's the status of that satellite ? Is it blue, green or red ?

Are groups of your own team crossing the screen ? Where to ? Did they leave a satellite undefended ? What does the minimap say ? Is there an enemy going towards the currently undefended satellite ? Does it need defense ? Or is it relatively safe to let it alone for a few seconds and help your own team ?

Is there a few enemy fighter coming out from an respawn point and heading towards an unguarded satellite ? How far away is it ? Does it require you to boost towards it ? Or can you use rockets or The Gun ?

Keeping an eye on the status of the satellite is perhaps the most important thing. If you are in a Gunship, and see a swarm of enemy fighters fly away to another node - like Locusts - then you could try taking out the seemingly currently undefended satellite. However, most teams leave an (soon bored) guardian behind to guard that satellite. You must take him out first, if you are there. And if you took him out, then you MuSt constantly monitor the screen : If someone approaching ? Did he yell for help using his voice comm ? If so, then you've got to play hide and seek" ASAP.
If not, then you can begin to take out the turrets from a safe distance. As a Gunship pilot, that's your job. But be quick, because that fighter you just took out moments before will soon be back again ! And perhaps even with friends !

This is the analysis that should go on inside of you all of the time - here described from the point of view of an Gunship pilot.

However, identifying Swarms is still important, imho.
And to constantly monitor the status of "your" satellites.

P.S. : Swarms do exist in groiund PvP as well - they are moch worse to identify, though, and a player can more easily be shut down by them, though.
Complex minds
Cope with
Complex problems.

AskLyesmyth's Avatar


AskLyesmyth
12.15.2013 , 07:03 AM | #16
Quote: Originally Posted by Nethgilne View Post
Don't be discouraged and start thinking that headsets are instant win. Effective communication and team coordination is a skill just like any other, especially in this game where it is harder to keep track of your teammates than your enemies.

Certainly they have an advantage but its one they have to practice at as a team to put to good use. I'm also willing to bet that the vast majority of players are pugs.
I would just like to add to this statement that maybe you should get upset bc headsets ARE instant win. Check it out, a squadron of fighters that uses communications to coordinate their attacks will pretty much always beat a mob of 12 independent pilots running around a dogfight without trying to work together. Yep, war is a team sport ppl. Let's take, for example, the 70% of encounters that occur in head to head drive-bys, how do these usually end? A third guy swoops in out of nowhere and blasts one of the two drivers-by away. So, yes personal piloting skill and all that is great, but I'd like to be running some team drills.

The_Raven_Lord's Avatar


The_Raven_Lord
12.15.2013 , 09:09 AM | #17
Maybe this thread should get a sticky. There's a lot of very useful pointers here!

On the topic of communication:

You and your squadron have to practice this, learn the maps, work out land marks to help guide your buddies to your position if you need assistance. But as it was pointed out before, it isn't an "instant win" it takes time, practice, and refinement!

Your personal skill matters a lot, so practice, practice, practice!

"FOTM builds" don't mean jack if the pilot can't figure out which way is up and which way is down. No matter how good your fighter is, the better pilot will always win!

Also remember when NOT to fight, this has been pointed out, but it can't be stressed enough, don't try to fight against the odds. There's no shame in running away and coming back when the odds are in your favor. The winner of a fight will always be the one who carefully chooses the time and place for a battle, and always fights where he or she will have the advantage.

For example, scouts are very agile, fight Gunships where you can take cover behind debris or structures and render their railguns useless. If you're a Gunship pilot, don't even try and take on a good scout pilot in such an environment, keep a good distance and pick off pilots who get careless and wander off from their squadrons.

Also, in the words of pilots around the world: "Never trade luck for skill"
Currently in an Imperial rehabilitation facility receiving treatment for WoW addiction.

Xakthul's Avatar


Xakthul
12.15.2013 , 09:14 AM | #18
Question: Do gunships have better armor than the other models?

In my experience, if you orbit an enemy sat with a gunship and are able to camp unnoticed before the turrets spawn, you will either be able to cap it, or easily pick off the turrets and whatever strikes there are. However, always have a wingman for this, usually a strike, as well-armed scouts can pretty easily screw a badly armored Gunship (like me!) if they get too close.

If you do this, make sure to kill the turrets before your wingman flies out, or you will both die.
Duelist Mixalot, Grand Champ Tellsa, Lord Saml, Apprentice Syynx, Captain Cirris, Skirmisher Janewei, Jedi Knight Jugger'not, Agent Ez'zio of <Wookies and Cream>, Harbinger
"Aim for the trolls! Kill the trolls!"- Gandalf

Turajin's Avatar


Turajin
12.15.2013 , 10:54 AM | #19
Quote: Originally Posted by The_Raven_Lord View Post
PRACTICE! PRACTICE PRACTICE!

Don't get frustrated and say it's really bad after your first few games. Some people will get it quick, others need about 10-20 games before they get used to the controls.
For me, the "Practice" thing doesn't work so far.

I sucked in the first two games, because the Controls are...
The next couple games I did quite good... in most cases I ended aomewhere in the middle of the ranking list. (I played something like 2 or 3 games a day)
But the last few games I sucked even more than in the beginning few games.

At the moment, I decided not to play GSF any more - not as long as it remains a sole PvP-thing.
It simply isn't fun to wait some 10 Minutes (that's about the time it takes in average until I get listet for a game), wait another more 2-3 Minutes (loading screen) to then have a 10 Minute or so game that consists only of beeinmg blasted to peices 7-10 times in a row. And from beeing shot (without knowing how, and from where) I learn nothing - neither tatctics nor skill in flight control improve. And certainly, it doesn't motivate me to join further games - wich means I don't play it very often. Which ragain esults in me not getting better, what again leads to even more and quicker deaths the next time I join, and so on.

So, I wait vor the PvE content. Until that is included, I'll propably won't play GSF anymore.

archifikoss's Avatar


archifikoss
12.15.2013 , 03:24 PM | #20
Quote: Originally Posted by Turajin View Post
For me, the "Practice" thing doesn't work so far.

I sucked in the first two games, because the Controls are...
The next couple games I did quite good... in most cases I ended aomewhere in the middle of the ranking list. (I played something like 2 or 3 games a day)
But the last few games I sucked even more than in the beginning few games.

At the moment, I decided not to play GSF any more - not as long as it remains a sole PvP-thing.
It simply isn't fun to wait some 10 Minutes (that's about the time it takes in average until I get listet for a game), wait another more 2-3 Minutes (loading screen) to then have a 10 Minute or so game that consists only of beeinmg blasted to peices 7-10 times in a row. And from beeing shot (without knowing how, and from where) I learn nothing - neither tatctics nor skill in flight control improve. And certainly, it doesn't motivate me to join further games - wich means I don't play it very often. Which ragain esults in me not getting better, what again leads to even more and quicker deaths the next time I join, and so on.

So, I wait vor the PvE content. Until that is included, I'll propably won't play GSF anymore.
I think you got plonked into matches with people with superior upgrades - were you focusing on upgrading a single ship, or spreading the upgrades around? And if so, were you directly upgrading specific components or simply unlocking them to try them out? Because your experience reflects mine to an extent - though after those next few games where I did badly again, things improved and I am usually high up in the objectives ranks at the very least.

As far as getting shot at goes - use the "who's targeting me" function thingy (I think the default is C) - as well targeting the closest ship that's targeting you. Use the environment to break LoS, try not to panic as it can lead you into freezing up, or crashing into an asteroid. Use the minimap and be ready to switch targets on the fly - even if I'm sitting on an objective I target the nearest enemy every two seconds and have my eyes on the minimap at all times.