Please upgrade your browser for the best possible experience.

Chrome Firefox Internet Explorer
×

Valkorion: Kneel before the Dragon of Zakuul

STAR WARS: The Old Republic > English > Story and Lore
Valkorion: Kneel before the Dragon of Zakuul

anthonyfarhatjed's Avatar


anthonyfarhatjed
12.16.2016 , 02:31 PM | #1
Still wondering how Valk's latest catchphrase "Kneel before the Dragon of Zakuul" backfired against him in Chapter 9 of KOTET?
Does it have anything to do with the fact that Valkorion consumed Vaylin's soul after her death? If so, how could the phrase work on Vaylin still? Especially after she managed to break free of its control on Nathema?
I usually search Wookiepedia, the admins there usually post a detailed synopsis of the expansion, but not this time, or at least not yet...
Any help with this twist?

Paulsutherland's Avatar


Paulsutherland
12.16.2016 , 02:34 PM | #2
'Your mind, your rules?' I struggled with this one too. It makes no sense!

TrueBritannia's Avatar


TrueBritannia
12.16.2016 , 02:59 PM | #3
Quote: Originally Posted by anthonyfarhatjed View Post
Still wondering how Valk's latest catchphrase "Kneel before the Dragon of Zakuul" backfired against him in Chapter 9 of KOTET?
Does it have anything to do with the fact that Valkorion consumed Vaylin's soul after her death? If so, how could the phrase work on Vaylin still? Especially after she managed to break free of its control on Nathema?
I usually search Wookiepedia, the admins there usually post a detailed synopsis of the expansion, but not this time, or at least not yet...
Any help with this twist?
"My mind, my rules" is essentially it. The whole fight is taking place in your mind so you ultimately have control of the framework that it all takes place in. This is why Valkorion throughout the story nudges you away from thinking about him to instead thinking about Arcann and then Vaylin, and why he offers you his power to slowly weaken your hold. If you had wished to you could've fought and destroyed him at the start, as he had no grip on you and so was essentially powerless. Remember, he's "hollowing you out", not just seizing control.
The Augusta legacy (The Progenitor)

Ottavio Sorc lI Livyna Hunter II Excelsus Knight
Nymerios Consular II Aireon Warrior

anthonyfarhatjed's Avatar


anthonyfarhatjed
12.16.2016 , 04:27 PM | #4
Quote: Originally Posted by TrueBritannia View Post
"My mind, my rules" is essentially it. The whole fight is taking place in your mind so you ultimately have control of the framework that it all takes place in. This is why Valkorion throughout the story nudges you away from thinking about him to instead thinking about Arcann and then Vaylin, and why he offers you his power to slowly weaken your hold. If you had wished to you could've fought and destroyed him at the start, as he had no grip on you and so was essentially powerless. Remember, he's "hollowing you out", not just seizing control.
I agree with your take on this, but the Outlander said "My mind, my rules. And I say what's good for Vaylin is good for you" then Valkorion replies "hehehe Clever". He clearly implied to Vaylin's relation to all of this... There is also something I can't seem to fully gasp, when you release Vaylin (her soul) you release it from the Nathema holocron, how is that even possible? Since Valkorion consumed her soul to control it? (Ok maybe somehow, the sith grandpa residing in your unconsciousness managed to trap his psycophath daughter's soul in the holocron HE built ages ago to trap his own father, which is in your pocket... somehow)
But if I am to consider, what you said about the mind theory to be true, why would the Outlander use the specific sentence Valkorion used on Vaylin's conditioning if it wasn't related? Why wait, and try to trap his soul in the datacron, summoning his *quite lovely* family to aid you in the fight against him, then suddenly when he seems to be winning you remember the mind trick? Makes no sense to be honest... The plot suggests something more was at hand, a clever plot twist that was poorly executed or shown in-game maybe?

DeltaBos's Avatar


DeltaBos
12.16.2016 , 08:04 PM | #5
Quote: Originally Posted by anthonyfarhatjed View Post
I agree with your take on this, but the Outlander said "My mind, my rules. And I say what's good for Vaylin is good for you" then Valkorion replies "hehehe Clever". He clearly implied to Vaylin's relation to all of this... There is also something I can't seem to fully gasp, when you release Vaylin (her soul) you release it from the Nathema holocron, how is that even possible? Since Valkorion consumed her soul to control it? (Ok maybe somehow, the sith grandpa residing in your unconsciousness managed to trap his psycophath daughter's soul in the holocron HE built ages ago to trap his own father, which is in your pocket... somehow)
But if I am to consider, what you said about the mind theory to be true, why would the Outlander use the specific sentence Valkorion used on Vaylin's conditioning if it wasn't related? Why wait, and try to trap his soul in the datacron, summoning his *quite lovely* family to aid you in the fight against him, then suddenly when he seems to be winning you remember the mind trick? Makes no sense to be honest... The plot suggests something more was at hand, a clever plot twist that was poorly executed or shown in-game maybe?
I don't really think Valkorion inherited Vaylin's weakness when he absorbed her spirit, but your character had an ironic sense of how to handle the situation. Up until the point where Valkorion destroy's the holocron, that was the plot devise you had against him. Once Valkorion destroyed it, your character had to find a way out of the situation, and then basically realized this was a dream world. Not only was this a dream world it was HIS/HER dream world, and as such, he/she could just make up rules. In this instance, the Outlander decided, "hey, you know how you were so terrified of your daughter becoming so powerful that you broke her mind to the point she basically lost her ability to use the force when you uttered a specific phrase? Well, here's a taste of that medicine." Notice that phrase does nothing to Vaylin at this point, highlighting that she is truly free, and your character can even tell Vaylin, "look at your father trapped in the cage he built for you." So, in a nutshell, your character basically realized that he/she could win just because of where this battle is taking place, and he/she decided to win in an ironic way.
Query: Is there someone that you need killed master?

thebumpkin's Avatar


thebumpkin
12.17.2016 , 09:52 AM | #6
Quote: Originally Posted by Paulsutherland View Post
'Your mind, your rules?' I struggled with this one too. It makes no sense!
On the contrary It makes perfect sense. Lucid dreaming is probably the best real life example of what you did to Valkorion in that final battle.
"I love killing Cultists. Makes me feel like I'm tidying up the Galaxy. - Bounty Hunter, Hoth main planetary story.
"I thought the interrogation we faced on Manaan was severe. Darth Marr made that little session seem like a picnic! - C2D4, Shadow of Revan Post Darkside choice.

AshlaBoga's Avatar


AshlaBoga
12.17.2016 , 10:44 AM | #7
Quote: Originally Posted by thebumpkin View Post
On the contrary It makes perfect sense. Lucid dreaming is probably the best real life example of what you did to Valkorion in that final battle.
That's what I thought during my first playthrough too!

Of course, being a Dark Lord, my dreams are 100% more awesome and important than the rest of the Galaxy
The dark is generous, and it is patient, and it always wins.
It always wins because it is everywhere.
The brightest light casts the darkest shadow.
Click my Referral Code for free goodies!

Vodolebon's Avatar


Vodolebon
09.26.2017 , 06:19 PM | #8
Quote: Originally Posted by thebumpkin View Post
On the contrary It makes perfect sense. Lucid dreaming is probably the best real life example of what you did to Valkorion in that final battle.
The deus ex machina "my mind my rules" can make sense, but what doesn't is Valkorion not foreseeing that could happen. He doesn't seem particularly idiot nor impulsive.

But that's not what caught my attention in my first Kotet pass:
While on Nathema, before you enter his little chamber of secrets, Vaylin is performing her ritual and a fog of death is pursuing you. And as you enter the chamber and close the door, you can see the mighty Valkorion is scared.
I found that interesting ^^

I still didn't understand his goal, but haven't played any force user in kotet, so i'll see.

footb's Avatar


footb
09.26.2017 , 08:27 PM | #9
Valkorian wasn`t as powerful as he used to be after he entered you which allows you enough power over him where you can fight back. While he was still alive he couldn`t be defeated as easily as he was in your mind

IoNonSoEVero's Avatar


IoNonSoEVero
09.26.2017 , 10:22 PM | #10
Quote: Originally Posted by thebumpkin View Post
On the contrary It makes perfect sense. Lucid dreaming is probably the best real life example of what you did to Valkorion in that final battle.
I think this is spot on. The player's own psyche coaches them through the first part of that chapter, telling them over and over again to save themselves and leading them in the right direction. They literally build their own bridges as they repair their memories. And a lot of KOTFE and KOTET is about the Commander learning to trust in their own abilities. When Valkorion's trying to tempt them to use his power, over and over again he's telling them that they can't do it alone and undercutting their confidence. And in all the other chapters, if the Commander tells Valkorion to leave their mind, they're always sort of *asking* him...not ordering him.

So going in a Wizard of Oz type direction - "You had the power to go home all along, but you wouldn't have believed me if I'd told you before" - makes a lot of sense to me. The Commander's finally able to draw on the power to kill Valkorion once and for all because they realize they can.