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Does SWTOR end with the galaxy ending up in some sort of dark age?

STAR WARS: The Old Republic > English > Story and Lore
Does SWTOR end with the galaxy ending up in some sort of dark age?

SW_display_name's Avatar


SW_display_name
04.07.2014 , 07:36 PM | #11
Worse than that I'm pretty sure Obi-Wan says "thousands of generations" which is how we ended up with the assumption in EU continuity that the Pub existed for like 20,000+ years. Then yes we get Palpatine's firm 1000-year comment.

That, and I think someone else in the prequels said something along the lines of "there's never been a true war in the history of the Republic" (paraphrasing) with again is like

So yeah, you're right, Ruusan and the Dark Age was explicitly engineered to mark a period of time where the Republic crumbled so badly that it was common in the 'reformed' Golden Age Republic to view it as a separate/reborn entity. But, it's important to remember that in literal terms, both Republics were a direct continuing line in terms of culture, environment, inhabitants, etc.

That's not to say that the NSW era didn't do huge damage to the Republic's presence and influence in the Mid/Outer Rim it absolutely did, similar to the lingering effects of (for example) the ancient xenophobic/genocidal Pius Dea crusades are attributed to anti-Human sentiment even "now" in certain territories (especially fringe).

Dayshadow's Avatar


Dayshadow
04.08.2014 , 01:42 AM | #12
Quote: Originally Posted by SW_display_name View Post
Whatever happens in SWTOR, it has to end with the Galactic Republic winning and the Sith Empire being broken/scattered once again.
One of the reasons Darth Bane started the Rule of Two is because the Sith would always fail due to infighting. I thought the writers said that the Sith undo themselves (naturally) and the Empire and Republic come to an understanding and merge over time. That is the envisioned ending of this chapter in history. The Empire is never outright defeated.
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SW_display_name
04.08.2014 , 09:46 AM | #13
Quote: Originally Posted by Dayshadow View Post
One of the reasons Darth Bane started the Rule of Two is because the Sith would always fail due to infighting. I thought the writers said that the Sith undo themselves (naturally) and the Empire and Republic come to an understanding and merge over time. That is the envisioned ending of this chapter in history. The Empire is never outright defeated.
That makes sense enough. Really, it's what I've been imagining since I started playing if you just took the Sith away, the everyday people of both Republic and Empire seem fairly similar and would probably join forces.

Part of what this Sith Empire incarnation seems to rely on to whip up its citizens is the propaganda that the Jedi and Republic are in some way villainous or evil. As Jadus points out himself in the Agent plot, the common citizens of the Empire are completely out-of-the-loop in terms of actual Sith philosophy and beliefs.

But the longer the war drags on, the harder it's going to be to keep painting distorted images of the Jedi/Republic, since it's almost impossible to succeed at full censorship in the galaxy vs. say one country (eg North Korea).

Now objectively speaking, it is reasonable to see why the Sith themselves would genuinely believe the Jedi/Republic are villainous. If you start from the premise that both Dark & Light are equally-viable philosophies, then the 'light' dominance is just lucky circumstances and the Jedi/Republic are jerks and religious zealots as much as the Sith.

But in order to establish themselves, the Sith rely on an army and economy and population that seems to be heavily composed of 'average' people ones that are very similar in basic beliefs to the Republic (eg, they dislike pain, conflict, suffering, just want to live their lives & be happy, etc).

That's a recipe for disaster, to try to rule a population that fundamentally doesn't share your core beliefs. But I'm guessing the Sith don't want their population sharing their core beliefs for the very reason the Sith view Jedi/Republic beliefs as heresy a population raised on true Sith doctrine would (in their eyes) become significantly more powerful, independent, and less likely to fear their masters.

But in the process of keeping their citizens suppressed like that, they inadvertently make it easier for them to identify and sympathize with their enemies.

JagoPulastra's Avatar


JagoPulastra
04.08.2014 , 02:34 PM | #14
Not to mention the Senate (and Republic by virtue) catches a lot of flak.

A lot of it. Which is only natural when you're dealing with a government that has, realistically, thousands of member states and their representatives. It's hard to keep track of it all. A war gets forgotten or brushed away here, some social injustice gets a slap on the wrist there, the Republic continues to think it does such an awesome job but meanwhile you get planets or even entire systems and sectors who first-hand witness Republic Corruption. And they don't like it.

Then this Empire comes along saying that they have strong leadership (ha) and no corruption (haha), and where The Republic failed, The Empire would succeed. Hell, that idea alone is how I play my Imperial Agent; The Empire is a force for change against the stagnant, bureaucratic Republic that forgets the little guy under the weight of the entire Galaxy.

So yes, the people aren't really all that different at all. You see a lot of extremists in TOR, but that's a natural part of societies too. In the end, the civilians on all sides just want peace and a return to trade and prosperity, rather than living in fear under the threat of war. So most likely, The Empire was defeated, or at least absorbed, by The Republic, and the focus went back towards rebuilding after the war.
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DAWUSS
04.08.2014 , 05:34 PM | #15
I wouldn't be surprised if the Darth Desolus conflict receives a few retcons in the future.