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So the Jedi Order never heard of grief counselors?

STAR WARS: The Old Republic > English > STAR WARS Discussion
So the Jedi Order never heard of grief counselors?

Master-Nala's Avatar


Master-Nala
01.17.2012 , 03:01 PM | #1
One of the things in Star Wars I have always found funny is the complete lack of mental health services among the Jedi. I mean, the whole premise of the order's code is to deny emotions their proper outlet. That is basically the opposite of dealing with emotional problems in a healthy way.

Anakin is the principal argument for why this was beyond stupid. At many, many points in the prequel trilogy, it was clear you were dealing with a severely disturbed young man wracked by grief and guilt. We're dealing with a society that has had interstellar travel for 50,000 years IIRC. It seems to me that if Anakin had been given the help he needed to learn to deal with loss and grief in a healthy way (i.e. don't hold it in, grieve and acknowledge that it's OK to feel sad sometimes) that Windu would have killed Sidious, Luke and Leia would have grown up Jedi, and all would have been right with the galaxy.

Thoughts?

ObiQuiYett's Avatar


ObiQuiYett
01.17.2012 , 03:20 PM | #2
Apparently, that's not an issue for this era, as the Jedi do have grief counselors.

There's a quest on Nar Shaddaa, in fact, where a Jedi war hero fell to the dark side during Imperial imprisonment, and should you rescue him, the Jedi Order brings a healer to help him sort out his post-traumatic stress.

It is an interesting observation, though. The Jedi of this era actually accept that the people can be redeemed from the Dark Side, whereas that ideal apparently becomes disillusioned between then and the Movie Era. It probably has a great deal to do with Satele Shan being the Jedi Grandmaster that the council is so quick to trust reformed Sith, but when comparing her to Yoda's standpoint of "forever will it dominate your destiny," one has to wonder, "What happened?"

Rhudian's Avatar


Rhudian
01.17.2012 , 03:30 PM | #3
The Jedi of the Clone Wars era generally make more sense if you think of Yoda as a backwards fundamentalist.

mminczes's Avatar


mminczes
01.17.2012 , 03:40 PM | #4
Always thought Yoda should have had more compassion in that scene in EP3 rather than just telling Anakin "don't mourn for the dead, don't miss them. accept it and move on". For someone who's been training young people for 800 years, you'd think he'd be more perceptive of Skywalker's mental state even with his diminished ability to discern with the force. Even acknowledging Anakin's obvious grief would have gone a long way towards steering him away from anger I think

Master-Nala's Avatar


Master-Nala
01.17.2012 , 05:49 PM | #5
Quote: Originally Posted by ObiQuiYett View Post
Apparently, that's not an issue for this era, as the Jedi do have grief counselors.

There's a quest on Nar Shaddaa, in fact, where a Jedi war hero fell to the dark side during Imperial imprisonment, and should you rescue him, the Jedi Order brings a healer to help him sort out his post-traumatic stress.

It is an interesting observation, though. The Jedi of this era actually accept that the people can be redeemed from the Dark Side, whereas that ideal apparently becomes disillusioned between then and the Movie Era. It probably has a great deal to do with Satele Shan being the Jedi Grandmaster that the council is so quick to trust reformed Sith, but when comparing her to Yoda's standpoint of "forever will it dominate your destiny," one has to wonder, "What happened?"
Your comment gets to something I've believed for a long time. It seems that technology and other forms of progress actually are going backwards in the SW galaxy. The Rakata seemed to have tech that makes the Death Star look like a child's toy for example.