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The March of Science!


Heimskringla's Avatar


Heimskringla
12.13.2011 , 05:36 PM | #11
Quote: Originally Posted by Geladius View Post
Massive wars that annihilate civilizations tend to have a negative effect on technology advancement. Look at the Dark Ages.
Pretty much this. We forgot how to build domes and make concrete here on Earth... just imagine what the war-torn galaxy far-far away has forgotten.

Also, there's an idea that once technology has advanced to a certain point, it become difficult to do more than make minor improvements upon it. It's sort of like a diminishing return.
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- I spent $149.95 on a video game with no release date, and all I got was the key to the executive washroom.

JSleeper's Avatar


JSleeper
12.13.2011 , 06:41 PM | #12
Quote: Originally Posted by Heimskringla View Post
Pretty much this. We forgot how to build domes and make concrete here on Earth... just imagine what the war-torn galaxy far-far away has forgotten.

Also, there's an idea that once technology has advanced to a certain point, it become difficult to do more than make minor improvements upon it. It's sort of like a diminishing return.
I think this is more or less the case. They've reached a technological plateau where the kind of exponential improvements we're experiencing are just not possible.

IsaakC's Avatar


IsaakC
12.13.2011 , 08:11 PM | #13
I see what you mean. I mean, look at how much our civilization has progressed. 2,000-3,000 years means the difference between having the internet or having roads. Star Wars is a fictional Universe so hard to make significant technological reduction and still make players feel like they're in the same universe they've come to know and love.
If Anakin Skywalker fought Darth Vader, Doc Brown wins.

Nyysjan's Avatar


Nyysjan
12.14.2011 , 01:41 AM | #14
Science marching forward?
Not in Star Wars, here science, or atleast technology, goes backwards (seriously, where are all the personal force fields and stuff during OT).
Quote: Originally Posted by CloudKiller View Post
Agent: "If you want a door smashed down call a Sith Warrior, if you want a door blow to pieces call a Bounty Hunter, if you want the key to the door and the knowledge of what lies beyond it then you call me."

Levias_Kohl's Avatar


Levias_Kohl
12.14.2011 , 01:48 AM | #15
You typically don't improve a technology if it isn't already at the top of the "best in _____" category.

Most times, most people will operate with the most frequented and generalized products for the majority of the tasks at hand. As I recall, people still use dynamite to blow stuff up. If you've got money, you invest into bigger, better bombs. If you don't, use the tried-and-true.

Laser guns/swords don't seem to have needed to be upgraded into anything other than what they were to begin with. Same with the hyperdrive. Just make bigger/better versions. As I recall, some species still use slug-throwers, so....guns as we know them still exist. Missiles too; and grenades....

Need I go on?
----I'm a paladin, with 18 Charisma and 97 hit points. I can use my Helm of Disintegration and do 1d4 damage as my half-elf mage wields his +5 Holy Avenger.

qamarnahaar's Avatar


qamarnahaar
12.14.2011 , 03:04 AM | #16
Setting continuity reasons aside, for most of human history, technology improved gradually over generations. It's really only in the past two centuries we've seen the sort of exponential technological growth we're currently accustomed to. The idea of constant progress is a modern conceit. Realistically how much more will we need to develop before we reach a plateau? With Jedi mind powers, cheap unlimited power sources, commonly available hyper-drive routes across an entire galaxy, advanced cybernetics, droids, and lifesaving biotech, it's easy to imagine a society that stagnates for millennia with no real impetus for major leaps in technological advancement.

Kellan's Avatar


Kellan
12.14.2011 , 04:31 AM | #17
Quote: Originally Posted by qamarnahaar View Post
Setting continuity reasons aside, for most of human history, technology improved gradually over generations. It's really only in the past two centuries we've seen the sort of exponential technological growth we're currently accustomed to. The idea of constant progress is a modern conceit. Realistically how much more will we need to develop before we reach a plateau? With Jedi mind powers, cheap unlimited power sources, commonly available hyper-drive routes across an entire galaxy, advanced cybernetics, droids, and lifesaving biotech, it's easy to imagine a society that stagnates for millennia with no real impetus for major leaps in technological advancement.
This. The other thing to look at is improvements over new stuff. For instance, TOR has the hyperdrives, but are they as fast as in the OT? I think an ISD would destroy a Hammerhead easily.

Look at firearms as an example. We are constantly making improvements to firearms, bullets, cartirdiges, etc. At the core however it is fundamentally the same, an explosive charge propel metal along barrel at high velocity to inflict injury upon soft tissues. Some sources cite the Chinese having working firearms as early as 700 AD. That's 1300 years we've been using the same basic principle for firearms, though it has been improved.

The internal combustion engine could serve as another example, sources citing the first ICE to be around the 13th century. That's 7 centuries of improvement, but again pretty similar execution. You can see a lot of these paralells in our tech, where we are constantly "tweaking" it. Star Wars tech for a lot of people would have hit the top so to speak. FTL travel gets the job done so it sits in the "tweaking phase" where people just keep pushing it (like the classic "She'll make .5 past lightspeed". If you look at it that things are getting tweaked, but brand new ground breaking things are invented, then factor in constant strife and it seems the Star Wars universe isn't that far fetched or stangnant after all.